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STRATEGIC PLAN 2016 - 2021

Performance Management Plan 2016 – 2018

                                            

                                                       Strattegic.p.1

INDEPENDENT NATIONAL COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS OF LIBERIA

OLDEST CONGO TOWN, MONROVIA – LIBERIA

WEST AFRICA

INCHR of Liberia Strategic Plan 2016 – 2021

Performance Management Plan 2016 – 2018

Contents

Foreword ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- iv

Declaration -----------------------------------------------------------------------------  v

Acknowledgement--------------------------------------------------------------------- vi

Abbreviations and list of acronyms--------------------------------------------------vii

CHAPTER 1: LEGISLATIVE, POLICY AND OTHER MANDATES

     1.1 Background---------------------------------------------------------------- 

     1.2 Constitutional Mandate---------------------------------------------------

     1.3Legislative Mandate-------------------------------------------------------

     1.4Mandate of the Paris Principles------------------------------------------

     1.5 Policy Mandate------------------------------------------------------------- 4

CHAPTER 2: INCHR AREAS OF HUMAN RIGHTS CONCERN

                         A CONTEXTUAL ANALYSIS

2.1 Human Rights Situation in Liberia--------------------------------------- 6

            2.2 Human Rights Issues------------------------------------------------------- 7

            2.3 Human Rights Institutional Challenges--------------------------------- 10

2.4 Political and Social Implications ---------------------------------------- 10

2.5 Economic Implications

      2.5.1 Budgetary Constraints and Funding Sources---------------------12

2.6 Legal Implications---------------------------------------------------------- 12

2.6.1 Domestication of International and Regional Instruments---------- 13

 2.6.2 Overlapping Mandates----------------------------------------------13

2.7 Other Implications

 2.7.1 UNMIL Transitioning------------------------------------------------13

    2.7.2 Post Ebola Recovery--------------------------------------------------14

    2.7.3 Peacebuilding and Reconciliation-----------------------------------14

           2.8 Forging Strategic Partnerships---------------------------------------------14

CHAPTER 3: Strengthen Weakness, Opportunities and Challenges

                        (SWOC) Analysis

          3.1 Strategic Planning Process-------------------------------------------------- 16

          3.2 Structure of the Strategic Plan-----------------------------------------------17

          3.3 Situational Analysis-----------------------------------------------------------17

               3.3.1 Strength-------------------------------------------------------------------18 

               3.3.2 Weaknesses---------------------------------------------------------------18

               3.3.3 Opportunities-------------------------------------------------------------18

               3.3.4 Challenges-----------------------------------------------------------------21

CHAPTER 4: STRATEGIC DIRECTION------------------------------------------21

            4.1 Vision---------------------------------------------------------------------------22

            4.2 Mission (Statement of Common Purpose)---------------------------------22

            4.3 Core Values-------------------------------------------------------------------- 23

            4.4 Strategic Outcomes------------------------------------------------------------24

             4.5 Strategies-----------------------------------------------------------------------24

                4.5.1 Strategic Targets----------------------------------------------------------24

                4.5.2 Strategic Intervention Plan----------------------------------------------26

           

CHAPTER 5: EXPECTED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

              5.1      Key Result Areas

             5.1.1 Improved service delivery by the Commission---------------------33

             5.1.2 Enhanced cooperation with stakeholders----------------------------33

              5.1.3 Improved access and respect for Human Rights--------------------35

              5.1.4 Improved state compliance with International, Regional

and National human rights obligations-------------------------------35

5.1.4Adequately informed  and empowered citizenry--------------------35

             5.2 Transitional Justice Issues---------------------------------------------------36

                                                                                                                          ii

CHAPTER 6: MANAGEMENT OF INCHR STRATEGIC PLAN

               6.1 INCHR Management Structure--------------------------------------------39

               6.2 Commissioners of the INCHR---------------------------------------------39

               6.3 Management Committee----------------------------------------------------39

               6.4 Financing the Plan-----------------------------------------------------------40

               6.5 Department’s Results Matrix (Logframe)--------------------------------40

           

CHAPTER 7: STRATEGIC PLAN COSTING & RESOURCE

                         MOBILIZATION PLAN

                7.1 Introduction------------------------------------------------------------------77

                7.2 Cost Estimates---------------------------------------------------------------78

                7.3 Resource Mobilization Plan------------------------------------------------81

         7.3.1 Government of Liberia Contribution (2010 – 2015)--------------82

              7.3.2 Private Sector-----------------------------------------------------------82

                    7.3.3 External Resources Mobilization (International Partners)---- 83

                    7.3.4 Sustainability-----------------------------------------------------------83

           

CHAPTER 8: STRATEGIC PLAN – TWO YEAR PERFORMANCE

                      MANAGEMENT PLAN (JULY 2016 – DECEMBER 2018) ---85

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         iii

Foreword

The Independent National Commission on Human Rights (INCHR) considers its mandate of protecting and promoting human rights in Liberia as critical to peace, reconciliation and sustainable development in Liberia.  Accordingly, during the implementation of its Strategic Plan over the next five years (2016-2021), the Commission will focus on achieving its strategic results areas as articulated in this Plan, and will deepen its advocacy, education and outreach program.  This includes setting up regional offices and deploying the requisite staffing that will fully engage with a range of actors at the county and district levels to promote and protect human rights thereby minimizing human rights violations across Liberia.  At the same time, the INCHR will ensure a continued focus on its protection mandate through strengthening and enhancing its capacity to deal with all the human rights complaints it would receive annually. The Commission also recognizes that 2016-2021 period includes important milestones and events that will impact on the implementation of its Strategic Plan.  These events flagged in the Strategic Plan as the political, social, economic and environmental context, center around the national elections, post Ebola Recovery efforts, UNMIL transitioning, peacebuilding and reconciliation, the current financial situation, especially as Liberia is a dependent economy.  This period will also provide an opportunity to reflect on the work of the Commission especially during the first 5 years of functioning,   build on its successes and chart a new direction for the future.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    iv.

Declaration

The INCHR declares:

  1. That this Strategic Plan was developed by the Secretariat of the INCHR led by the Department for Planning, Internal Monitoring and Evaluation (DPIME), under the guidance of the Board of Commissioners (BOC). 
  2. It takes into account all the relevant policies, legislation and other mandates for which the Commission is responsible; and
  3. It accurately reflects the strategic focus areas and strategic outcomes, goal and objectives which the INCHR will endeavor to achieve over the period of 2016 - 2021.

Acknowledgement

The Board of Commissioners (BOC) of the Independent National Commission on Human Rights (INCHR) acknowledges with profound gratitude the efforts of staff of the INCHR including the Commissioners and the Secretariat as well as the Departments for developing this Strategic Plan that articulates the INCHR programs and activities for the next five years.

The Commission also remains gratified to all its partners that read the first and second drafts and made comments and suggestions.  The Commission also expresses its felicitations to the government, CSOs and its partners that participated in the validation of the Strategic Plan. The development of the Strategic Plan has been completed; however its implementation is the most crucial. The Commission looks forward to the government and its partners for all the support.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           vi. 

Abbreviations and list of Acronyms

African Commission on Human and People Rights (ACHPR)

African Union (AU)

Agenda for Transformation (Liberia Medium Term Growth and Economic Strategy) (AfT)

Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL)

Board of Commissioners (BOC)

Bureau of Corrections and Rehabilitation (BCR)

Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization (BIN)

Child Rights Act (CRA)

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs)

Community Based Organizations (CBOs)

Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA)

Criminal Conveyance Act (CCA)

Department for Administration and Budget (DAB)

Department for Complaints, Investigation and Monitoring (DCIM)

Department Education, Training and Information (DETI)

Department forLegislative Assistance, Treaty Matters and Law (DLATL)

Department of Planning, Internal Monitoring and Evaluation (DPIME)

Decent Work Law (DWL)

Freedom of Information Law (FOI)

General Auditing Commission (GAC)

Global Alliance for National Human Right Institutions (GANHRI)

Government of Liberia (GoL)

Economic Community of West Africa States (ECOWAS)

Independent National Commission on Human Rights (INCHR)

Human Rights and Protection Section – UNMIL (HRPS)

Human Rights Resouce Center (HRRC) – at the INCHR

International Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)

International Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment (ICTCIT)

International Coordinating Committee (ICC)

International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) - Optional Protocol

Justice and Seccurity Joint Programme (JSJP)

Land Authority Act (LAA)

Land Rights Act (LRA)

Lesbians, Gays, Bi-Sexual and Trans-Gender (LGBT)

Liberia Anti-Corruption Commission (LACC)

Liberia National Police (LNP)

Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF)

Ministries, Agencies and Commissions (MACs)

Ministry of Finance and Development Planning (MFDP)

Ministry of Gender, Children, and Social Protection (MoGCSP)

Ministry of Internal Affairs (MIA)

Ministry of Justice (MoJ)

National Action Plan (NAP)

National Elections Commission (NEC)


National Civil Society Council of Liberia (NCSCL)

National Human Rights Action Plan (NHRAP)

National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs)

National Security Agency (NSA)

Network for Africa National Human Rights Institutions (NANHRI)

New Education Reform Law (NERL)

Organization of African Unity (OAU)

Peacebuilding Fund (UN) PBF

Performance Management Plan (PMP)

Persons With Disabilities (PWD)

Public Finance Management (PFM)

Public Procurement and Concession Commission (PPCC)

Strategic Roadmap for National Healing Peacebuilding and Reconciliation (Reconciliation Roadmap)

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Transitional Justice Issues (TJI)

Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC)

United Nations Country Team (UNCT)

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs / BHR)

United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL)

Whistle Blower Law (WBL)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        vii. 

CHAPTER 1: LEGISLATIVE, POLICY AND OTHER MANDATES

  1.1 Background

The Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) signed in Accra, Ghana in 2003 to end the second Liberia civil war, acknowledged the dire need for the promotion and protection of human rights and called for the establishment of an Independent National Commission on Human Rights (INCHR). Thus in 2005, in line with Article VIII of the CPA, the INCHR was established by an Act of the Legislature as a national institution to promote and protect human rights. The creation of the INCHR was also a deliberate attempt to begin addressing the excessive disregard and disrespect for human rights that precipitated and characterized the 14 years long Liberian civil crisis.  Although created in 2005, the Commission did not become operational until 2010. 

The INCHR was also set up in line with the Paris Principles of 1993 which amongst others require “States to give a National Human Rights Institution (NHRI) “as broad a mandate as possible, which shall be clearly set forth in a constitutional or legislative text, specifying its composition and its sphere of competence”.

The INCHR is envisioned as a vital national institution created to ensure the realization of human rights not as an end in itself, but also to play an instrument role in achieving other national strategic objectives, employing rights based approaches within the governance structures; enhancing peace and national reconciliation, and ultimately contributing to human development.

The Commission consists of seven (7) full time Commissioners including a Chairperson, a Vice Chairperson- and five other Commissioners, to ensure implementation of the mandate and functions of the Commission assigned by its Act.  The Commissioners are appointed by the President of the Republic Liberia, on recommendations of an Independent Committee of Experts (ICE) constituted by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Liberia in consultation with civil society organizations. Except for the Chairperson who serves a six year tenure, all six Commissioners, with the consent of the Senate serves a tenure of five years each.  

The Act further explains that Commissioners must be Liberians of good social standing. The appointments are to reflect the diversity of the Liberian society with due attention paid to NGOs and professional organizations with a track record on human rights advocacy and protection.  

1.2 Constitutional Mandate

The 1986 Constitution of the Republic of Liberia is the organic and supreme law of the Country and contains a Bill of Rights in its Chapter III. While there is no direct constitutional mandate regarding the establishment and work of the INCHR, the 


[1] Following the enactment of the Act establishing the INCHR, the process of nominating nominees to the INCHR met with serious delays. An Independent Committee of Experts (ICE) submitted a shortlisting of INCHR nominees to the President in early 2007 but in February 2010, the Legislature finally rejected en bloc the INCHR nominees placed before them for confirmation. With this rejection, the process of vetting possible INCHR nominees had to begin afresh. In March 2010, a new ICE was constituted for this purpose.

Constitution of the Republic of Liberia guarantees to each citizen and resident certain inalienable and fundamental rights and liberties. Constitutional obligations regarding fundamental human rights include ‘civil and political rights’ (Article 11 (a)), and ‘economic, social and cultural rights’ (Article 6). In addition, the President of Liberia is empowered by Article 34 (f) and 57 of the Constitution, to conclude treaties subject to approval of the Legislature. 

Thus far, Liberia has ratified or acceded to a number of international treaties, conventions and protocols and has incorporated them into the law of Liberia and are legally binding domestically. A few include:

  • International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and its Protocols
  • The Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment and its optional Protocol (CAT)
  • Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW)
  • Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (ICERD)
  • Convention on the Rights of Children (CRC)
  • Convention on the Rights of Person with Disabilities (CRPD)
  • Rome Stature of the International Criminal Court

1.3 Legislative Mandates

The mandate for the INCHR is clearly defined in its Act of 2005, as an independent national institution to promote and protect human rights. The Act also recalls the commitments of Liberia, as a founding member of the United Nations and the Organization of African Unity (OAU), now the African Union (AU), and a signatory to its Charter, which expresses strong commitment to the principle of human rights. The Government of Liberia has also expressed its firm faith in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted and proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 217 A (II) of 10 December 1948 and is a party and signatory to a wide range of international human rights and humanitarian treaties and conventions which re-emphasize and re-confirm these basic inalienable rights. (See Annex I for a summary of major international human rights instruments Liberia has ratified or joined by accession).

Further, the Commission is empowered by articles 3 and 4 of its Act to execute the following mandates:

 a. Protection and Promotion of Human Rights throughout the Republic of Liberia: the Commission has the mandate to conduct or support research on human rights, develop educational programs for the teaching of human rights in schools, universities and other professional institutions. The Commission, acting as a source of human rights information for the Government and people of Liberia, can also make use of State and public media organs to educate and increase public awareness about human rights and efforts to combat all forms of discriminations 


Article 2 of the constitution emphasizes that in the hierarchy of legal norms, treaties are subject to the Constitution.

  1. including ethnic discrimination. It is also the function of the Commission to educate relevant state institution (i.e. LNP, BIN, NSA, AFL, etc.) on international humanitarian laws and other human rights treaties and protocols to which Liberia is a state party to ensure compliance and respect for human rights; 
  2. Investigation of Complaints of Human Rights Violations and Conduct of Hearing: The Commission has the power to investigate any human rights situation or complaint of human rights violation filed by any person(s).  It can hear complaints and petitions of human rights violations brought before it by victims, their representatives or any other third party. Such a hearing must be consistent with due process. Where human rights violation is proven, the Commission may recommend to Government or the concern authority, prosecution or other action against the perpetrator. It can recommend to the Government or the concern authority, immediate interim relief for victim(s). It can approach the courts seeking declaratory judgment for the purpose of obtaining relief for victim(s);
  3. Proposing Amendments or Reform of Laws, Policies and Administrative Practices and Regulations: The Commission is empowered to review legislative and administrative laws in force and examine bills and other policy proposals to ensure consistency and conformity with national and international human rights standards. It can make recommendations for new legislations, amendment to existing legislations including administrative regulations. Where any law or administrative practice hinders or unreasonably complicates the filing of complaint of abuses, the Commission shall ensure amendment;
  4. Advice Government on the Implementation of National and International Human Rights Standards: The Commission can submit to the Government advisory opinion, recommendations, proposals and reports on any matter concerning the protection and promotion of human rights. It can give advice and assistance to Government in the implementation of national and international human rights standards and support harmonization of national legislation, regulations and practices with international human rights instruments.

1.4 Mandate of the Paris Principles

Finally, as mentioned above, the INCHR was also established in accordance with the Paris Principles adopted in 1993 by the United Nations General Assembly, and is therefore beholden to work in compliance with the Paris Principles, which requires of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) to:

  • Protect human rights, including by receiving, investigating and resolving complaints, mediating conflicts and monitoring activities; and
  • Promote human rights, through education, outreach, the media, publications, training and capacity building, as well as advising and assisting the Government.

The Paris Principles also sets out six main criteria that NHRIs are require to meet:

  • Mandate and competence: a broad mandate, based on universal human rights norms and standards;
  • Autonomy from Government;
  • Independence guaranteed by statute or Constitution;
  • Pluralism;
  • Adequate resources; and
  • Adequate powers of investigation.

1.5 Policy Mandate

The National Human Rights Action Plan of Liberia (NHRAP) (2013 – 2018): The NHRAP describes amongst other things, Liberia’s responsibilities in the area of human rights, the long-term objectives of the Government and the roles of various actors and institutions including the INCHR regarding work on human rights at the national level. The NHRAP reinvigorates Liberia’s commitments to foster and guarantee the overall development of all persons and populations by respecting, defending and promoting their human rights, ensuring the full exercise of civil, political, social, economic, cultural, and environmental rights deemed inseparable, interdependent, and equally essential.

The Agenda for Transformation (AfT) (2012 – 2017): This Liberia Medium Term Economic Growth and Development Strategy highlights the commitments of the government with respect to human rights. The goal stated in the AfT is to “combat human rights abuses and advance the welfare of all Liberians, irrespective of sex, ethnicity, geographical location, political affiliation, and socio-economic condition”. A few strategic objectives outlined in the AfT include:

  1. Adopt comprehensive and inclusive policies to protect the human rights of all Liberians
  2. Strengthen accountability and enforcement mechanisms for human rights violations during and since the civil war in order to promote peace and reconciliation and curtail the culture of impunity.
  3. Strengthen commitments and awareness of communities and CSOs to advance human-rights, particularly for vulnerable groups including persons living with HIV and AIDS.

The AfT also lists a few outcome indicators to be met by 2017. These are:

  • Policies and regulation approved and being implemented
  • Number of cases of human rights issues reported and resolved increased
  • Prosecution and penalization of persons committing human-rights violations and trafficking of humans increased

Also, in the AfT, human rights issues are highlighted and integrated as cross-cutting issues along three of the five Pillars:

The Peace, Security and Rule of Law Pillar require efforts to be exerted to strengthen integrity of the justice system to reduce human rights violations;

The Economic Transformation Pillar requires efforts to be employed to strengthen the regulatory environment to eliminate child labor.

The Governance and Public Institutions Pillar, provides that the INCHR must work with the Government to review existing legal framework and enact new laws to protect human rights of all, especially for women, disable and People Living With HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Also assigned to the INCHR is the responsibility of helping the Government meet key deliverables on transitional justice and other rights based issues intended to promote and protect human rights.

At the same time, the Strategic Roadmap for National Healing Peacebuilding and Reconciliation assigns to the INCHR the responsibility of implementing three (3) thematic areas in the Reconciliation Roadmap, intended to mend broken relationships, heal the wounds of the past and help reconcile the country. These include: the national palava hut talks, memorialization, and reparations.

In addition, the Act establishing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) assigned to the INCHR the responsibility of following through on the implementation of the TRC recommendations. The TRC findings and recommendations present an opportunity for the Commission to understand human rights violations prior to and during the years of civil wars, issues for accountability, memorialization and reparation. The Commission may adopt programs and take corrective actions to prevent recurrence. 

Further, in the Government of Liberia (GoL) revised peacebuilding and reconciliation paper of December 2, 2015, and the revised Statement of Mutual Commitments adopted between GoL and the United Nations Peacebuilding Commission (UN PBC) in April1, 2016, the Government clearly recognizes that “the consolidation of peace in Liberia is an enduring, long term agenda that needs to be anchored on a complex interplay amongst the imperatives of development, human rights, justice, security and social cohesion”. To this end the GoL commits to:

  • Promoting access to justice and to ensuring the effective functioning of the courts for the adjudication of disputes and protection of defensible interests, which are critical to the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms, and the sustenance of peace and economic development;
    • Improving prison conditions, promoting child justice, and establishing units of technical assistance and advice to support all sectors of government services which remain critical challenges; and
    • Ensuring the implementation of the National Human Rights Action Plan geared toward the promotion and protection of human rights across all spheres of governance, including in particular the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) recommendations of the UN Human Rights Council, which also remains critical to the promotion of the rule of law, moving forward.

As the National Human Rights Institution the INCHR is challenged to play a critical role working closely with other responsible institutions to achieve these commitments.


Also of equal importance, the INCHR will work with the relevant institutions of government as well as the Human Rights and Protection Service of the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Civil Society Organizations and related institutions to not only set up a human rights framework for the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) but also to help ensure human rights targets are achieved.

Finally, given the limited resources available, it will be very useful to identify and focus on specific areas of human rights protection, monitoring and promotion that are not covered by the mandates of any other existing constitutional bodies. Partnerships could include the establishment of a mechanism for early referrals of complaints to relevant institutions and a system of tracking and monitoring these referrals.

CHAPTER 2:  INCHR AREAS OF HUMAN RIGHTS CONCERN – A CONTEXTUAL ANALYSIS

This section analyzes and informs on the boarder human rights context and situation in Liberia, something which is indispensable and constitutes the core of this Strategic Plan.  It looks at progress made thus far in the promotion and protection of human rights in Liberia but also highlights key challenges that still persist which the INCHR must work very hard with the government and other institutions to address. In addition, this section looks at the institutional challenges not only of the INCHR in  addressing human rights in the country, but also government institutions that are primarily responsible to coordinate human rights responses, including meeting international human rights obligation (i.e., the MoJ, LNP, Human Rights Unit, Ministry of Gender Children and Social Protection, Disability Commissions, and civil society, etc.). The analyses contained in this chapter informs on what human rights challenges the INCHR wants to address, what capacity gaps there are, and how the Commission sets out to help address those challenges through the implementation of the Strategic Plan.

2.1 Human Rights Situation in Liberia

Over the last few years, the government of Liberia, working with various partners and actors including civil society, has made notable progress in the promoting and protecting human rights. Progresses have been made both at the strategic or policy level as well as at the individual levels. At the policy levels the government has ratified a number of international treaties, conventions and optional protocols and has also domesticated a few including: (1) the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in 2012, (2) The National Commission on Disabilities (NCD) has been designated as the Secretariat for the CRPD and is responsible for leading the treaty reporting and implementation processes for the CRPD.  (3) In 2013, the Government adopted a national strategy on implementation of the CRPD.  (4) Liberia signed the Optional Protocol to the CRPD and favorably considers its ratification. 

Liberia also indicated in its report to Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review (second circle) covering the period 2010 – 2014, that the government has considered the ratification of the Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and has already taken a number of legislative and policy measures to comply with the provisions of both instruments. The Children’s Law, which was passed in 2011, enshrines the right of the child to be protected from involvement in armed conflicts and violence. With regard to the Optional Protocol on the sale of children, child prostitution, and child pornography, the Children’s Law provides for the right of the child to be protected from harmful work and from sexual abuse and exploitation.  The Government has submitted periodic reports to the CEDAW and CRC Committees and in 2016 submitted the Common Core Document to the Human Rights Council.

In addition, in 2014, Liberia also launched its Five-Year National Action Plan in the Fight against Trafficking in Human Beings, and the Government has established a National Anti-Human Trafficking Task Force co-chaired by the Ministries of Labor and Justice. Furthermore, the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare has placed a moratorium on international adoptions due to concerns about the trafficking of children and has submitted a proposed Child Adoption Act to the Legislature to improve the regulation of international adoptions.

Reporting further, Liberia indicated that it favorably considering the ratification of the International Convention on the Rights of Migrant Workers and Their Families (ICRMW), the International Convention on the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (ICPPED), and the Optional Protocols to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). In order to facilitate the ratification of human rights instruments, and to promote greater coordination among government actors in the areas of treaty ratification, reporting, domestication, and implementation, the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has developed a National Strategy for Meeting Regional and International Human Rights Treaty Obligations (the “National Strategy”). The National Strategy highlights the instruments recommended for ratification by the previous UPR cycle and encourages their ratification at a suggested timetable. It also proposes the establishment of a National Body on Treaty Obligations to coordinate efforts to ratify human rights treaties and to meet existing treaty obligations through the appointment of high-level human rights focal person at all relevant line ministries and agencies.

At the individual level, the government with support of her partners, has conducted several trainings in human rights for rule of law and security officers aimed strengthening the institution and human capacity to uphold human rights in the execution of their work. There have been some efforts aimed at sensitizing and educating the public, especially traditional leaders and elders, on harmful traditional practices, while some efforts have been made to address prolonged pretrial detention and the overall condition of prisons and prisoners.

2.2 Human Rights Issues

Despite some positive development, Liberia continues to face a variety of human rights challenges as a post-conflict nation. INCHR annual reports of 2014 and 2015 highlight a number of human rights issues confronting the country based on regular monitoring and from complaints received.

Liberian Constitution guarantees the right to fair trail inter alia, the right to a presumption of innocence and to be charged and tried without delay. About 65% of inmates are pre-trial detainees.  There is a lack of political will to address the interrelated issues of prolonged pre-trial detention such as lack of plea bargaining, long trial delays, low rates of prosecution, poor investigation, community non-cooperation on criminal matters, and lack of professionalism among justice and security actors.  The judicial system remains weak with lack of qualified and adequate staff, lack of operational funds, and lack of logistical support such as vehicles and stationery for effective operations. The “fast track” court system, an important proposed solution to these issues, has largely failed due to low funding. There have been some efforts to address the situation including through the establishment of Regional Justice and Security Hubs designed to provide a “one stop shop” in the administration of justice, however the progress is rather slow. While the Liberia National Police (LNP) has established a Professional Standards Division to receive complaints of police misconduct, law enforcement lack of professional and logistical capacity remains a persistent challenge.

To date most of the prisons in Liberia, suffer from overcrowding, unhygienic conditions, lack of adequate food, access to health facilities and improper sleeping arrangements. Prisons also lack appropriate programs for the rehabilitation of convicted prisoners. The overarching challenges in the judiciary, law enforcement, and corrections have resulted in a lack of public trust in the justice system.

The democratic right including freedom of expression is recognized in the Constitution. Increasingly it has been noted that laws including criminal libel against the President, sedition, criminal malevolence and terroristic threats are being used to curtail freedom of expression. Liberia is party to the Table Mountain Declaration of 2012 which has directed countries to review the laws that provides for criminal libel. However, there is no serious move by the Government to review laws in line with the Declaration.

The high prevalence of SGBV, particularly rape of children, continues to be a major concern exemplified by very low level of prosecution and adjudication. SGBV data provided by the Ministry of Gender and Social Protection indicates, for example, in 2014 and 2015, there were above 1500 rape cases reported throughout the country, but only around 4 per cent perpetrators was convicted by courts during the same period. This has resulted in a high level of impunity.Human Rights violation within the cultural and traditional practices remains a concern. The UNMIL report on Human Rights Issues Emanating from Traditional and Cultural Practices has enumerated a number of harmful traditional practices including female genital mutilation (FGM), trial by ordeal, accusation of witchcraft, forceful initiation into secret societies, including rape, torture and murder committed in the pretext of traditional practices.

The Government has not been able to bring perpetrators to justice in most of these instances.  The Ministry of Internal Affairs responsible for regulating cultural practices and sensitizing traditional actors on Liberia’s human rights obligation faces human rights capacity gap.

This all has barred progress on the implementation of some major human rights instruments especially those affecting the rights of women and girls. For example, the issue on FGM is still a serious taboo and practiced widely across Liberia. A draft bill on domestic violence which included a section of FGM was submitted to the House of Representatives indicative of attempts to address the recommendation on FGM but legislators have shown reluctance to retain the provision in the bill. Liberia has ratified the AU Protocol on the Rights of Women but still has to enforce it and harmonize this with other national laws. One could also use the treaty on torture as reliance since FGM is now classified as a form of torture. But this has to be recognized by the Government. The INCHR faces the challenge of getting the government to recognize and relay on international treaties and conventions in the execution of laws. With respect to transitional justice issues especially related to the implementation of the recommendations contained in the TRC Final Report of June 30, 2009, progress has been made in the implementation of recommendations that are more developmental related. However, little or no concrete actions have been made to addressing recommendations on criminal accountability for human rights violations associated with the Liberian civil war.

With respect to the Right to Health, lack of access to primary health services by low income earners and ordinary citizens especially in rural communities remains serious concern.  Essential drugs and other medicines are either not available or are expensive. Health facilities are not equipped with necessary medicines, laboratory and other equipment to properly diagnose causes of ailments and health problems. 

Equally on the Right to Education, while Liberian law guarantees free and compulsory primary education, this is not yet fully actualized across Liberia. Until today a good number of school age children is still being used by parents or guardians as bread winners for the homes. In addition, poor educational facilities coupled with poor learning conditions continue to be pervasive. In most cases, where education facilities do exist, the disparity in the educational system remains alarming, and quality education is still illusive to many children. In addition, the numbers of school drop outs especially girls after the elementary level remain of grave concern and this is compounded by early marriage, and in some cases, Sande activities which conflicts with the school calendar thereby affecting formal education.

Related to the Right to Employment Opportunities, a large number of the citizens of working age, especially youths, have no jobs – while at the same time, there are insufficient programs to create jobs. While there are a few notable efforts on the side of the government to provide skills training and create jobs as in the case of the Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Program, and the Joint Program for Employment and Empowerment of Young People in Liberia (JP-YEE) a critical review of the Liberian situation and context will show that youth programs have not been holistic and comprehensive.

Since 2006, hitherto, most of the interventions have only been short-term. Most times the focus is on labor intensive work programs targeting vulnerable youths and last between three to six months. Where some forms of trainings have been provided, the trainings are often not intensive and there are little or no incentives to attract young people and keep them in these programs.

Finally, on the Rights of Children and Women, as have been mentioned above, the government has taken notable steps and actions to help address violations of the rights of children and women; however these steps and actions have been more at the socio-political level, with little or no corresponding change at the individual level. For example, policy measures and legislations developed or enacted have not translated into concrete actions by being able to address various human rights violations that women and children suffer. To date the vast majority of female raped are children below the age of 18 years – in most case they are minors. Little girls still suffer from harmful traditional practices including genital mutilation. Further, sexual exploitation and abuse as well as domestic violence against women and children still persist in many quarters across the country, while in most cases, their perpetrators go with impunity.  Another recent form of violence against children is where children are accused of being witch-craft and are being hypnotized to confess, by so called spiritualists or “man of God”.  This primitive notion of bedevilment and bewitchment – and the so called “deliverance” that follows have not been called to book. These are forms of exorcism and shamanism that at the end encourage stereotypes in the community and or school against the child or children accused.

2.3 Human Rights Institutional Challenges

As mentioned above there are a number of institutions within the government including line ministries, agencies and commissions that are clothed with the primary responsibility of ensuring full respect for and to protect human rights. For example, the Ministry of Justice, Human Rights Unit, which is coordinating government’s treaty obligations, lacks capacity. The Government also lacks effective coordination mechanism to drive human rights agenda in the country. On the legislative front, the Legislature has not demonstrated adequate recognition and commitment to its role in addressing human rights through legislative initiatives. There are very few examples where the Legislature has stood out in favor of human rights; instead, at times it has questioned strong human rights language in the bills under deliberation in the Legislature such as in the Domestic Violence Bill.  The Judiciary, which is the sole institution with the power to authoritatively check on human rights violations by other branches of the government, has institutional challenges including delays in adjudication of cases. The challenges these institutions are faced with range from lack of capacity, to resource constraints and logistics, as well as in some cases political will. While civil society in Liberia is gaining visibility, however, it suffers from underfunding and a weak capacity to monitor human rights, report on violations, and advocate for change in government at local and national levels. There is a paucity of human rights civil society organizations in the country overall, with most clustered in the capital and a very minimal presence in the counties. Civil society organizations that do operate largely lack coordination and information sharing capacity and often suffer from a culture of silence surrounding major national human rights concerns in Liberia.

The INCHR established by law in 2005 and in line with the Paris Principles of 1993 with a clear mandate to promote and protect human rights also has serious institutions challenges that inhabit it from fully achieving its legislative, policy, and other mandates as discussed in Chapter 2 of the Strategic Plan.  See also the SWOC analysis above in Chapter 3 on the INCHR.

2.4 Political and Social Implications

National Elections –Liberia is presently preparing for the 2017 Legislative and Presidential Elections that will usher in an entirely new Government. As the elections draws near, the nation remains highly politically polarized. In previous elections, polarization rather than becoming a conduit for uniting Liberians, further divided the country. The nation and its people have been polarized alongside social cleavages, ethnicity and sectionalism, and in some cases the “downtrodden masses versus the affluent”. There is also the issue of “generational change” where the majority of young people think it is time for them to take over the political leadership of the country. As always, the elections period has implications for human rights and thus the Commission must brace itself for this period and the immediate thereafter. In addition, the nation is also planning for the major National Referendum to amend the 1986 Constitution.  There are already a number of human rights concerns being raised as a result of some of the propositions being put forward, for example, the proposal to Christianize Liberia stated in Proposition 24.  It is anticipated that the volume of complaints may increase prior to the start and during the elections period which will be less than one year of the implementation of this Strategic Plan.

This increase in the number of complaints may largely result from hate speech, political intolerance, safety and security etc. that will affect the Commission’s complaints handling process.

Therefore, the INHCR intends to fully perform its role and functions as a Human Rights Institution related to elections processes which encompass monitoring, documenting human rights violations and abuses related to the electoral process, identifying local and national trends and patterns of violations and abuses, and taking preventive and corrective measures on specific human rights issues through advocacy and intervention during the electoral process. The Commission will work to ensure its enhanced competence of both knowledge and practical skills needed to apply early warning systems and to act timely in accordance with the role of a Human rights institution in electoral processes. At the same time, the INHCR will work with the government, including the NEC, security institutions, and political parties including their youth wings, and the media, in partnerships with CSOs to ensure the political competition becomes a conduit for promoting peace and reconciliation as well as promoting civil, political and economic, social and cultural rights of the citizens, thereby leading to peaceful elections.

In addition, the INCHR will engage political parties and politicians, media institutions, civil society and other key actors including youth, student and women groups to avoid using dangerous speeches that could further polarize the nation and lead into pre electoral, electoral and post electoral violence.

The INCHR is also considering how to handle various complaints during this period. The potential rise in complaints requires concerted efforts to engage with relevant institutions including the NEC, faith-based institution, the National Traditional Council of Liberia and other tribal groups, as well as civil society including the media, youth, and student and women groups.

Furthermore, following the elections, there may be political and administrative leadership changes at various government levels. This will require high level strategic engagement to advocate for and promote the work of the INCHR with the new leadership, including members of the National Legislature, Cabinet Members and Heads of various Ministries, Agencies and Commission (MACs) of Government as well as local authorities across the country. In fostering this strategic engagement, the INCHR will introduce advocacy strategies that communicate its work with a view to ensuring that the institutional mandate is popularized. The INCHR will also prepare itself to further engage on issues of representation of various groupings within new leadership arrangements.

  2.5 Economic Implications

  2.5.1 Budgetary Constraints and Funding Sources

Since its establishment, the INCHR has not been able to fully set up its five Departments and to fully deploy human rights investigators and human rights monitors across Liberia. The INCHR has also not been able to set up regional offices in the five regions of the country and resources have been inadequate to provide the needed logistics and equipment needed for its smooth operations.  This situation has not been due to lack of political will on the side of the government to adequately provide funding for the Commission, but due to limited financial resources in the midst of other competing national priorities.

In addition, over the last three years there has been decline in revenue due to the decline in commodity prices on the world market especially in the prices of iron ore and rubber which are two of Liberia key exports. The Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in 2014 and 2015 also contributed largely to the decline in foreign commodity exports as well as domestic revenue generation. Presently, the country’s economic outlook predicts limited growth over the coming years. These will inevitably have an adverse effect on the availability of financial resources generally, and on the Commission’s resources specifically. The Ministry of Finance and Development Planning recently advised stringent measures in the 2016/2017 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) and indicated that there will be little or no increment to allocations neither will there be any allocation for capital expense – something which is sure to put strains on the Commission to fully implement its mandate. This is of concerns to the INCHR as limited resources inevitably impact on institutional performance and the realization of intended outcomes. It raises the need for a strategic choice to be made regarding funding sources for the Commission. Considerations have also been given to whether the Commission should be embarking on an extensive external fundraising strategy, or continue to rely on the National Legislature requests and budgetary allocations from the MFDP alone.

While seeking donor funding may be an alternative, an opposing view is that, as a state funded institution, the Commission should not be reducing opportunities for civil society where funding may be lacking. Furthermore, the independence of institutions like the INCHR may be challenged by donor interests and requirements.

2.6 Legal Implications

The Commission will concern itself with all legislation that has implications for human rights by making submissions on draft legislation and through review of the existing laws. These efforts will be strengthened through monitoring the impact of legislative submissions on law making and policy formulation.  In addition to assessing the effect of legislative submissions, the Commission will increase the promotion aspects through advocacy and educational work on the implications of new legislation.

 

2.6.1 Domestication of International and Regional Instruments

The Commission seeks to promote compliance with international and regional obligations by calling on the State to ratify and domesticate international instruments and to regularly report on the implementation of these instruments. During the implementation of the Strategic Plan, increased attention will be given to monitoring the State’s obligations in relation to international agreements. This will be achieved through the development of various reports including national human rights reports and the Commission’s annual report.

2.6.2 Overlapping Mandates

The INCHR in its Annual Planning Retreat of May 2016 discussed the role and functions of the INCHR in comparison with other Government institutions with some human rights functions, such as the Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection, as well as that of CSOs/NGO.

The Commission has considered that given the limited resources available, it may be useful to identify and focus on specific areas of human rights protection, monitoring and promotion that are not covered by the mandates of any other existing Constitutional bodies. The INCHR will therefore forge partnerships both at the strategic and working levels with various line Ministries, Agencies and Commissions (MACs) and with institutions supporting democracy to ensure greater strategic focus and prioritization of rights. These partnerships could include the establishment of a mechanism for early referrals of complaints to relevant institutions and a system of tracking and monitoring these referrals. 

       2.6 Other Implications

On June 30, 2016, in line with its consolidated drawdown and withdrawal plan UNMIL handed over full responsibilities for security to the GoL. This handover has come with mixed reactions from the citizens. While some Liberians are positive about this hand over, other have expressed major concerns and are apprehensive because they do not have explicit confidence in national security institutions and personnel to provide full security for the state and its citizens. The relationship between most of the citizens, especially unemployed and vulnerable youths on the one hand and the state on the other, seems not to be very affable, while the relationship between most of the citizens and security institutions and personnel remains scrawny. In addition, there are concerns that as UNMIL transitions and national security becomes the full responsibility of state, national security institutions and authorities may revert to regime security and increase violation of human rights. Furthermore, as part of drawdown, UNMIL’s presence has now limited to only 3 counties. This will put pressure on the INCHR to be more vigilant in the counties.

2.7.2 Post Ebola Recovery

Since the end of the rapid spread of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in Liberia, several meetings have been convened by the Government and her partners to discuss the way forward in the wake of lessons learnt from the EVD and post-Ebola recovery. These working level meetings in particular have discussed both the opportunities and challenges of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) especially on the health sector and the Government and her partners have identified a number of ameliorating strategies. The spread of the EVD clearly demonstrated the porosity of the health sector resulting into the demise of a little over 4,000 Liberians including aliens. As the nation recovers from the devastating effect of the EVD and strategies to improve health care delivery are being advanced, the INCHR will push for the observance of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. In Article 12, “the right to the highest attainable standard of health” is conspicuously stated. Health is a fundamental human right indispensable for the exercise of other human rights. Further, the rights to health are recognized in numerous instruments including Article 25.1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which affirms that “everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health of himself and of his family….”

2.7.3 Peacebuilding and Reconciliation

Despite 13 years of peace and stability in Liberia since the end of the 14 years civil war, the nation still remains fragile. There is still much to be desired to address the key root causes of

conflict in Liberia and a key root cause has been the disregard and disrespect for human rights. The INCHR will work to ensure that human rights remain the sine qua non for peace, security and long-term development.

2.8 Forging Strategic Partnerships

The INCHR recognizes the dire need to forge strategic partnerships with a wide range of institutions, and to collaborate and coordinate with national, regional and international institutions and mechanisms which is indispensable to achieving its mandate. Forging strategic partnerships will not only help in mobilizing some of the resources needed for the Commission to fully implement this strategic plan, but will also help the Commission get the needed technical expertise and support to help it achieve its mandate. The chapter on costing further elaborates this situation and advances a resource mobilization plan that is consistent with Article XIX paragraph 3 of the INCHR Act that gives the Commission the leverage to mobilize funding internally and externally. In this regard, strategic partnerships with institutions supporting democracy, peacebuilding, justice and security and the rule of law, civil society, academic institutions and other stakeholders are alternatives to explore to help mitigate funding challenges.

Since its establishment, hitherto, the INCHR has received enormous support from the Human Rights and Protection Section of UNMIL especially in the areas to training, networking and capacity development. Through the UNMIL Quick Impact Project a few programs of the Commission have been supported. In addition, UNMIL Human Rights field monitors and field offices also provide support to INCHR human rights monitors assigned in the counties, while HRPS experts in Monrovia provide other technical support. Thus as the Mission comes to its ultimate end, the need for transfer of knowledge from UNMIL Human Rights experts and other technical staff to the INCHR staff will go along with in strengthening the capacity of the Commission. This transfer of knowledge will require regular monitoring, coaching and mentoring as well as support to mobilize the additional expertise needed both within and out of Liberia in specific areas of focus – for example in developing training manuals and piloting human education and training on various human rights related topics for diverse audience including the LNP, AFL, schools, civil servants, corrections officers, etc. Still related to human rights education and training is the establishment of a Human Rights Resource Center (HRRC) at the INCHR with provision of human rights materials, computer with internet, book shelves,  any other resources needed for this Center.  The establishment of the Center is being support by UNMIL, while books, publication, newsletters and various reference materials are being supplied by OHCHR in Geneva. Already the first consignment of books for the Resource Center has been received by the INCHR. Further, UNMIL HRPS can also support the INCHR to undertake more sensitization of women’s rights, children’s rights, non-discrimination, harmful traditional practices, and in developing flyers, audio visual materials, drama etc on human rights. Dissemination of the TRC and other reports on transitional justice issues by printing user friendly versions is also another area for UNMIL HRPS’s support.

Furthermore, as UNMIL transitions the traditional UN agencies, will assume some of the role and support UNMIL provided to government institutions including the INCHR. In this regard forging partners with the United Nations Country Team (UNCT) in Liberia will be crucial. Already a few UN agencies, in particular UNDP – Liberia continues to provide technical and financial support to the INCHR. However, much more will be desired going forward.

A  review of UNDP Country Program activities especially with regards to strengthening institutions of government in 2015, pointed out that although the country context offers many areas that UNDP can in fact support, the Country Office (CO) should remain strategic, focused and measured if its engagement is to have impact. To this end, [the report suggested] UNDP’s support should be prioritized, responsive to and situated within established national strategies like the National Human Rights Action Plan (NHRAP) and processes including the Constitutional Review process as well as strengthening the key national human rights institutions in Liberia. Three key groups of human rights institutions were identified namely: the Independent National Commission on Human Rights (INCHR), the Human Rights Units (HRU) in Ministries, and human rights CSOs. More specific recommendations were made with regards to supporting the strengthening of the INCHR to become fully operational including:

  • Assist the INCHR to address the institutional recommendations identified in the institutional assessment including the review, revision and development of procedures and systems necessary for it to carry out its core functions;
  • Facilitate the exposure of members of the INCHR to mature NHRIs to learn how they function;

Advocate at political and policy level, a steady increase in the government’s budget allocation and commitment to the INCHR;

  • Support building the prioritized and basic technical and functional capacities of staff of the INCHR in a sequenced way; and
  • Support programs to increase awareness about the INCHR and basic human rights.

Furthermore, the INCHR has been establishing a tripartite relationship with various institutions including line Ministries Agencies and Commission (MACs) of government, civil society institutions and non-governmental organizations to help facilitate and support its work.  Working groups are being established on protection, harmful traditional practices, child labour and transitional justice. The objectives of the working groups are as follows:

  • To identify trends of vulnerability and provide plausible scenarios to mitigate the identified vulnerability by regularly liaising with GoL ministries and agencies to highlight triggers of  these vulnerabilities
  • To strategize and raise awareness that will reduce the frequency of harmful traditional practices such as FGM, Trial by ordeal and build a relationship with traditional leaders to ensure that they inculcate human rights in their traditional practices
  • Work with diverse stakeholders including local authorities to raise awareness on the negative consequences of child labor
  • Work with key national institutions and CSOs to discusses transitions justice issues as articulated in the Truth and Reconciliation Report (TRC), Reconciliation Roadmap and Agenda for Transformation to decipher concrete and practical actions for the implementation of thematic areas and recommendations.

CHARPTER 3: SWOC ANALYSIS

3.1   Strategic Planning Process

                                                                                                                           

This Strategic Plan is a result of a rigorous process of consultations with the Commissioners and the Secretariat of the INCHR, and key stakeholders and actors including key government institutions: the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning, the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the Liberia Peacebuilding Office, the Ministry of Justice and the Program Management Unit of the Justice and Security Joint Programme (JSJP), the National Civil Society Council of Liberia and other civil society organizations and non-Governmental Organizations, UNMIL Rule of Law Section, and Human Rights and Protection Service (HRPS), UNDP, the United Nations Country Team (UNCT), the PBF Secretariat and a few bilateral and multilateral institutions including ECOWAS and African Union Liaison Offices in Liberia, and donors partners that reviewed the draft plan, made substantive inputs and suggestions and participated in the final validation exercise. The Plan was developed following desk reviews of key legislative and policy frameworks, and strategies as well as the Paris Principles, operational plans and reviews of related literature. It has built upon the INCHR Three Year Strategic Plan (2012 – 2014) and annual work plans. In addition, the INCHR held a Strategic Planning Retreat in from May 12 – 14, 2016 to conduct a situational assessment of the Commission. The Retreat not only conducted analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Challenges (SWOC) of the INCHR, but also reviewed and adopted its administrative/institutional policies related documents which were either revised or developed as part of the Capacity Assessment of the INCHR in May 2015. Underpinned by the Commissioners’ inputs, the process ultimately resulted in revised and clearly articulated goal and objectives and strategic outcomes for the next five years.

3.2    Structure of the Strategic Plan

This Strategic Plan has Eight (8) Chapters. Chapter 1 gives the introduction of the Strategic Plan and discusses the mandates of the Commission including Legislative, Policy and other mandates that guide the work of the Commission, while Chapter 2 conducts a contextual analysis of the INHCR areas of human rights concerns. In addition, Chapter 2 discusses the human rights situation in Liberia, key human rights issues, as well as key institutional challenges. Chapter 3 explains the institutional strategic review process. It also highlights the environment context in which the INCHR will implement this Strategic Plan. It looks at both the opportunities and challenges and considers the political and social implications that could, in some ways or the other, positively or negatively influence the implementation of this Strategic Plan. In this Chapter the Strength, Weakness, Opportunities and Challenges (SWOC) analysis is stated. Chapter 4 focuses the Strategic Direction on the INCHR, including its vision, mission and core values. In addition, this chapter outlines the INCHR strategic outcomes areas, strategic targets as well as strategic intervention plan.  Chapter 5 looks at what are the INCHR proposed strategic accomplishments over the next five years – the deliverables. Here it projects the Strategic Focus Areas, Strategic Outcomes, and Strategic Outcomes Objectives. Further, this chapter has a section on Transition Justice and Reconciliation. Chapter 6, discusses how the INCHR will manage its Strategic Plan. 

In this regard, it looks at the Results Matrix (Logframe) for each of the strategic areas, outcome and objectives, and then looks at the INCHR proposed Management Structure particularly with regards to role of the Commissioners and Secretariat in implementing its Strategic Plan.

It proposes a Management Committee to be established to oversee the implementation of the Plan and report on progress, challenges as well as funding. This chapter also articulates a coordination mechanism and direction to ensure the success of the Strategic Plan. In Chapter 7 the Strategic Plan is costed and a resource mobilization is advanced. Finally in Chapter 8, the Strategic Plan presents the first two and a half years Performance Management Plan (PMP) or the Monitoring and Evaluation Framework. It projects a rigorous formative evaluation of the Strategic Plan after the first two and a half years of implementation, after which the next two and half years the PMP will be developed. 

3.3    Situational Analysis

Referring to as the “environmental context” in the INCHR 2012 – 2014 Strategic Plan, this section considers the operating environment in which the Commission is compelled to execute its functions and deliver on its mandates. Attempt is made to examine both external and internal environment against which the Commission must strive to achieve its vision, goals and mandates. It also considers the current political situation of Liberia, the United Nations Mission in Liberia consolidated drawdown and withdrawal (UNMIL transitioning), post-Ebola recovery efforts, the forth coming 2017 Presidential and Legislative Elections as well as Liberia’s overall peace, reconciliation and development nexus.

3.3.1 Strength

  1. The Commission enjoys support from the Government through budgetary funding; 
  2. The INCHR Act provides wide mandate which allows the Commission the space to undertake creative initiatives;
  3. The Act also gives the Commission independence;  
  4. Qualified and competent Commissioners and human resource potential
  5. Salaries for 24 human rights field monitors within the government’s payroll ensures sustained presence of INCHR in the counties.
  6. INCHR has put in place and operationalized its key administrative related documents including: Jobs Descriptions and Terms of Reference Manual for existing and future posts, a revised Organogram, Standard Operating Procedures (SOP), and INCHR Staff Handbook with Code of Conduct, Financial Policy Manual, Procurement Policy and Petty Cash Policy. These documents will ensure the INCHR works with high degree of proficiency and efficiency.
  7. INCHR has in place a Complaints Handling Policy Manual that guides the Commission’s work in receiving, documenting, investigating and recommending findings of the complaints process.

      Weaknesses

  1. Less knowledge by the people about the role of INCHR in protecting and promoting human rights.
  2.  Inadequate financial resources and technical personnel to enable it effectively implement its mandate.
  3. Limited research to systematically address underlying issues of human rights abuses.
  4. Limited outreach to rural population.
  5. Limited formal cooperation with key stakeholders in the human rights sub-sector.
  6. Absence of a capacity assessment needs for human rights CBOs resulting in adhoc training activities, and
  7. Lack of institutionally owned office premises and lack of regional and county offices.

3.3.3 Opportunities

The Commission shall take note of and explore the following opportunities to achieve its mission:

Di   a. Direct Funding through the Budget: The Commission is funded through national budgetary allocation which under the Government of Liberia (GoL) Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) supports programs aligned with its core priorities. The Legislative Committee on Human Rights and the Committee on Public Corporations, Commissions, and Autonomous Agencies of the Legislature are ally of the Commission in lobbying for increases in allocation to the Commission.

       b. Support from International and Regional Human Rights Institutions and Mechanisms: The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) through its Secretariat and various Departments stands ready to support the INCHR in achieving its mandates. Also Global Alliance for National Human Rights Institutions (GANHRIs) as well as the Network for Africa National Human Rights Institutions (NANHRIs) are also available and ready to provide support to the INCHR to achieve its mandates including that of the Paris Principles, and to support the INCHR in achieving accreditation from the GANHRIs. The INCHR can also benefit from networking with various human rights mechanisms and institutions, and from peer review with other National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs).

        c. Support from the International Community: There is international good will in support of the realization of human rights in Liberia. The United Nations and foreign governments have shown interest in INCHR and are willing to support its programs. In addition, during the UPR in September 2015, key donors and partners supporting Liberia’s justice and security, democracy, development and peacebuilding programs made specific recommendations that will help address human rights violations and accelerate the promotion and protection of human rights in Liberia.

For example, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland` called for Liberia to “Implement provisions in the National Human Rights Action Plan for the protection of vulnerable individuals, including children, persons with disabilities, persons with albinism, persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS and issues around LGBT. (See recommendations 100.72.; Source of position: A/HRC/30/4/Add.1 - Para. 72). The INCHR is of the opinion that these donors and partners could be engaged to help provide both technical and financial support to Liberia to implement these recommendations.

  d. The Existence of the Liberia Anti-Corruption Commission (LACC): The presence of the Anti-Corruption Commission will help in the fight against corruption and promote increase in national budget revenue and increase allocation to development. Supporting LACC, the INCHR can then ensure the realization of economic, social and cultural rights and prevent the abuse of civil and political rights.  

  e. The existence of the General Auditing Commission (GAC): to conduct system and account audit of all public institutions among others is equally supportive of the fight against corruption and by extension the guarantee of human rights.

  f. Whistle Blower Law (WBL):

 g. The Public Procurement and Concession Commission (PPCC): was established to control corrupt practices and ensure accountability in public procurement processes. Public procurement has also become very crucial as it represents an enormous opportunity to promote respect for human rights and sustainable business practices globally. In addition, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development adopted by UN Member States in September 2015 has set new objectives on public procurement, as part of the drive towards sustainable production and consumption and more inclusive economies: Sustainable Development Goal 12.7 calls on all countries to promote sustainable public procurement practices and to implement sustainable public procurement policies and action plans.

   h. Public Finance Management (PFM) Act of 2009: provides an overarching legal framework for public financial management and control. 

   i. Freedom of Information Law (FOI): Liberia is the first West African Country to enact the FOI law which supports access to public document, acquire valuable information and increase informed participation of citizens in decision making. The Independent Information Commissioner has also been appointed.

  j. National Development Agenda: Liberia is progressing toward growth and development. The Agenda for Transformation was developed and projects an 18 years’ time horizon when Liberia will reach the middle income level by 2030, while at the same time promote peace security and reconciliation. The first AfT 5 year’s cycle is being implemented. The Governance Commission (GC) and the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning (MFDP) have launched the National Visioning – Liberia Rising 2030, an 18 years development agenda for Liberia. The Commission has a critical role to play to ensure humans rights are achieved through the implementation of the AfT and Vision 2030.

   k. The Children’s Law: Child Rights Bill has been enacted into law domesticating the international instrument – the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

   l. The new Land Authority Act (LAA): (that replaces the Land Commission) was enacted into law by the National Legislature. The Land Authority (LA) will work to implement the Land Rights Act (LRA), Criminal Conveyance Act (CCA) and other legal instruments that seek to address the pervasive land issues that cut across Liberia. As land is a major economic asset, the LA is to ensure rights based approach to implementing various policies as well as to land acquisition and ownership which ultimately considers the rights of women and other disadvantaged groups including indigenous people.

                L    m. Law and Constitutional Reform: Constitutional reform is a central process in Liberia’s national transition. There is a Law Reform Commission working to ensure a legal regime that expresses respect for the rule of law. The Constitution of Liberia needs to be made expressly human rights friendly and sensitive to the principle of non-discrimination.

          n. Institutional Reform: The Governance Commission of Liberia is involved in institutional reform processes; supporting the work of the GC is a critical role of the Commission. Non-discriminatory reform of the governance structure, the security architecture, the judiciary and promoting ethics and integrity are critical. 

         o.New Education Reform Law (NERL): The Commission may use the law to promote the realization of the rights to education.

          p. The Decent Work Law (DWL): the decent work legislation is a standard that promotes the rights to work in Liberia.  

        q. Civil Society as a partner: The Transitional Justice Working Group (TJWG) is providing support to the Commission. Over the next five years, the INCHR will collaborate and coordinate with civil society      through the National Civil Society Council of Liberia (NCSCL) and its regional networks across the country.

          3.3.3 Challenge

  1. External Influences: Considering our political culture and the politics associated with the TRC reports, the Executive and Legislative Branches of Government may try to exercise undue influences and control over the Commission; influences from other interest groups may threaten the independence and credibility of the Commission. 

  b. Public Perception/Expectation: Public perception and expectation of the Commission regarding its independence and integrity and its responsibility in the implementation of the TRC recommendations         are mixed. There is a dire need to regularly clarify the mandate and responsibilities of the INCHR.

    c. Coordination of Intervention: Loose and poorly coordinated human rights organizations and other stakeholders and respective interventions across the country may undermine networking and slow the             pace of the Commission outreach.

   d. Rent Payment: The Commission currently lacks a land and building of its own. It is therefore subjected to lease and rent payment. This may put a strain on the Commission budget. The Commission must        therefore take steps to ensure that it secure a building of its own within the period of five years.

CHAPTER 4: STRATEGIC DIRECTION

Whereas no formal measurements of impact have been undertaken, there is increasing potential that through INCHR’s continued engagement with the government institutions, ministries, the legislature, other government structures, civil society and the general public, more human rights knowledge will be received, leading to increased recognition and appreciation of human rights. INCHR has analyzed the human rights issues at hand, its internal and external factors affecting the attainment of its objectives as well as building on its previous engagements with key stakeholders to predict the future.

4.1 Vision

The INCHR envisions a “peaceful, secured and developed Liberia founded on the protection and promotion of human rights”.

4.2 Mission (Statement of Common Purpose)

In addition to its legislative and policy mandates (to be described below), the INCHR is guided by a set of common purpose and core values. The overarching purpose of the INCHR is to successfully fulfill Liberia’s obligations to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms by ensuring that each citizen or resident enjoys fully all inalienable and fundamental rights and liberties.

The Commission recognizes that the true measures of its success will be how it vigorously pursues and diligently exercises its powers in a manner that is honorable and legal and inspires or promotes continuous public confidence and support. Accordingly, the Commission will work promptly and with the highest standards of diligence, objectivity, integrity, professionalism and fairness and without undue infringement of a person’s recognized rights or privileges.

The INCHR further recognizes that it is accountable to the public that it serves and will strive to solicit and beseech support from the public primarily in order to effectively promote and protect human rights.

In furtherance of this purpose and to maintain set values, the INCHR pledges that its name and powers will always be used with restraint and with an awareness of their potential effect on the lives of the people it owes a duty. The Commission along with its Commissioners and staff individually and collectively promise and unequivocally proclaim that the authority and powers of the Commission shall never be used to gain personal advantage or promote any individual interest.

Commissioners and staff of the INCHR pledge themselves to establish and sustain effective and congenial relationships with individuals and a variety of organizations outside the Commission. ABSOLUTELY, discrimination, and partiality, either within the Commission or in dealings with people and organizations outside the Commission will never be condoned, acquiesced, or tolerated.

INCHR’s work will not be compromised or affected by any personal interest. Public resources will always be used efficiently and effectively. The security of information and the protection of persons working or dealing with the Commission will be protected at all times.

The INCHR as a human rights organization, affirms, declares, and shall at all times maintain a zero tolerance for any sort of unethical behavior whatsoever. Never will the Commission give protection that yields impunity.

Last and of equal importance the INCHR commits to work consistent with the Paris Principles of 1993.

4.3 Core values 

Strattegic.p.2

4.4 Strategic Outcomes

These are drawn in line with the institutional mandates, the National Development Plan, the Constitution, regional and international country obligations

1. Strengthened INCHR’s systems and institutional accountability,
2. Improved service delivery by the Commission,
3. Enhanced coordination and collaboration with stakeholders; 85% of funding needed for the Commission mobilized; and INCHR achieves 85% of the deliverables set in its Strategic Plan
4. Improved respect for human rights and citizens access to justice,
5. Improved State compliance with International, Regional and National human rights obligations
6. Adequately informed and empowered citizenry and residents

4.5 Strategies

In pursuit of its strategic direction, INCHR shall employ a number of strategies which in most cases are cross cutting. The specific interventions for the strategies are presented in the detailed outcome/output matrix.

4.5.1 Strategic Targets

A. Improved service delivery by the Commission

i) 90% of the required human resource recruited by 2021
ii) 90% of essential office equipment, logistics, furniture and supplies acquired by 2021
iii) INCHR internal management system reviewed and strengthened by 2021
iv) Office accommodation improved by 2021
v) INCHR complies with the government of Liberia PFM laws, PPCC laws and other financial rules of regulation
vi) INCHR achieves low risks rating resulting from proper financial management, compliance, reporting and external auditing.

B. INCHR coordination and collaboration with stakeholders enhanced; 85% of funding needed for the Commission to implement its programs and projects mobilized; and INCHR Departments and staff performance strengthened, efficient and proficient.

i) 80% of Working Groups (WGs) on human rights issues (involving representatives from human rights institutions) established and functioning by 2017
ii) Congenial working relationship built with 80% of NGOs/CSOs working on human rights in Liberia by 2021,
iii) INCHR accredited by the Global Alliance for National Human Rights Institutions (GANHRIs), based in Geneva, Switzerland
iv) Government develops and implements National Action Plan (NAP) on the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs / BHRs)
v) The 2017 National Elections conducted with due consideration for human rights principles and standards thereby fostering a violent free elections
vi) Government Fiscal Budget developed considering Human Rights Based Budget (HRBB) approach by 2021
vii) At least 85% of funding required for the INCHR to implement programs and projects by 2021mobilized
viii) At least 85% of the programs and activities in its Strategic Plan successfully implemented through efficient monitoring, reporting and evaluation by 2021

C. Improved access and respect for human rights

i) 80% of the complaints received and admitted related to human rights violations adequately addressed by 2021
ii) State actors comply with 60% of the human rights recommendations by 2021
iii) Quarterly and annual reports on the human rights situation of the country, as well as thematic, incidence, and /or special reports submitted
iv) 50% of indigents and pre-trial detainees have speedy access to justice

D. Improved State compliance with International, Regional and National human rights obligations

i) 60% of the international treaties ratified by the Government by 2021
ii) 50% of the required initial treaty reports submitted by 2021
iii) 50% on the international treaties domesticated by 2021
iv) 50% of the public policies, bills and legislations acquired and placed in the INCHR Human Rights Resource Center by 2021
v) At least 75% of the UPR recommendations achieved by the Government by 2020 and at least 80% of the TRC recommendations implemented by 2021
vi) Existing Laws repealed or amended consistent with international Human Rights instruments
vii) Gender issues and sensitivity mainstreamed in various human rights related policies, programs and interventions

E. Adequately informed and empowered citizenry

i) 60% of the population informed of their human rights and responsibilities by 2021
ii) 65 % of the population aware of the role of the INCHR by 2021
iii) 40% of the population able to demand their human rights by 2021
iv) 60% of government institutions, human right defenders and CSOs that work for the promotion and protection of human rights capacity enhanced and apply human rights standards in their work
4.5.2 Strategic Intervention Plan

A. Improved service delivery by the Commission

i) 90% of the required human resource recruited by 2021
a) Undertake functional review of the organizational structure from a technically focused to a functionally focused structure.
b) Reassign staff and recruit new staff to fill vacancies that will result from the functional review exercise.
c) In order to enhance staff retention and improve motivation, revise conditions of service and build staff capacity.

ii) 90% of essential logistics, office equipment, furniture and supplies acquired by 2021

The objective is to ensure that the Commission has all the necessary equipment and vehicles that will enable it to undertake the activities detailed in this plan. This will involve:
a) Procurement of motor vehicles and bikes, equipment, office furniture and maintaining them.
b) Review the Commission inventory and assess essential equipment gap

iii) INCHR internal management system and control reviewed and strengthened
by2021

The means of achieving this target will include:

a) Revise and operationalize policy
b) Review and print management manuals
c) Adhere to accountability requirements
d) Review and operationalize monitoring and reporting systems

iv) Office accommodation improved by 2021

a) In the medium to long term the Commission plans to construct its own office complex. However in the interim the focus will be on acquiring offices to establish regional and county (field) offices.
b) In the long term, acquire land for the Commission
c) Procure construction services for INCHR Headquarters.

v) INCHR complies with the Government of Liberia PFM and PPCC Laws as
well as other financial rules and regulations

a) Prepare monthly, quarterly and annual financial reports, statements and
budgets

vi) INCHR achieves low risks resulting from proper financial management,
reportingand compliance.

a) INCHR submits to external system and financial audits as may be required
by the GAC and related institutions

B. INCHR coordination and collaboration with stakeholders enhanced; 85% of funding needed for the Commission to implement its programs and projects mobilized; and INCHR Departments and staff performance strengthened, efficient and proficient.

i) 80% of Working Group (WG) on human rights issues established and functioning by 2021

In order to effectively involve relevant stakeholders and reach out to the populace, INCHR will establish working group on key thematic issues with membership drawn human rights civil society organizations. Human Rights Committees will also be established in the counties and district – perhaps county, district and community peace committees already functioning across the county are good point of entry. The strategies to be used to achieve the target are:

a) Develop and sign MoU or Aide Memoir with select institutions on Working Groups (WG); provide training for enhance their capacity; hold regular WGs meetings
b) Implement joint human rights programs on human rights as may be decided
c) Set up County Human Rights Committee (CHRC)
d) Provide training for established CHRCs on human rights monitoring, reporting and advocacy

ii) Congenial working relationship established with 80% of NGOs/CSOs working on human rights in Liberia by 2021

INCHR is committed to work with public institutions under governance sector to
Promotehuman rights issues. This will be achieved by the following strategies:

a) Hold quarterly coordination meetings on human rights violations and various issues
b) Obtain regular updates on various human rights violations and related issues from partners working in rural parts of Liberia (where INCHR does not have field presence) and organize joint programs and training on human rights

iii) INCHR accreditation by the Sub-Committee on Accreditation (SCA) of the Global Alliance for National Human Rights Institutions (GANHRIs) based in Geneva, Switzerland

a) Submit application for consideration for accreditation
b) Submit all the required documents including statement of compliance with
theParis Principles as may be requested by the SCA
c) Attend accreditation meeting to defend application in Geneva

iv. Government develops and implements its National Action Plan (NAP) on the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs/BHRs)

a) Develop and submit concept note and proposal to the European Union (EU)
forsupport towards developing NAP for the implementation of the UNGPs
on BHRs

b) Conduct massive public outreach, consultations and engagement forum and
sensitization to galvanize national urgency and commitments for a NAP on
theUNGPs on BHRs
c) Support the Government to set up National Advisory Board to lead the
development and implementation of the NAP
d) Conduct training with support from partners including the EU, UNDP,
UNMIL and the OHCHR Business and Human Rights Secretariat on
developing and implementing NAP
e) Engage research institutions (Humanity United) and human rights institutions (Danish Institute for Human Rights) and think tanks (Folke Bernadotte Academy (FBA)) to provide technical support (based on their expertise) and help conduct research on the impact of business on human rights in Liberia, etc.to set baselines and inform the development of the NAP
f) Organize along with the Government for various actors to attend and participate in the regular Annual BHR Forum
g) Work with the Government and other actors and conduct training on how to develop and implement NAP with technical support from the BHR Forum Secretariat based in Geneva

v. 2017 National Elections held with due considerations to human rights principles and standards thereby fostering a violent free elections

a) Develop and support proposal to partners to support the INCHR to play its
role as a NHRI in the 2017 selections and beyond
b) Organize trainings for various elections actors on Human Rights,
Democracy and the Rule of Law (with focus on the HR Based approach in
elections process) with technical support for the OHCHR’s Section on
Democracy and Rule of Law whichworks particularly on elections
c) Engage with various actors including the NEC, political parties, CSOs,
media, etc. to commit to upholding human rights especially with the ICCPR
and ICESCR, todo away with dangerous and hate speeches and promote
violent free elections
d) Deploy INHCR Regional and County Team to monitor and report on voters
registration, campaign, and pooling, tabulation of ballots as well as post-
electionsactivities

vi. Government Fiscal Budget developed considering the Human Rights Based Budgeting (RHBB) approach by 2021

a) Engage the Government in particular the Executive and Legislative to
commit to to developing a HBBB
b) Help arrange for the requisite expertise to conduct training on BRBB for
MACs of Government, especially the MFDP and the Nat’l Legislature
c) Follow-up on the MACs and review draft budget to ensure it reflects a
HRBB approach

vii. 85% of funding required for the INCHR to implement programs and projects by 2021 mobilized
a) Develop and submit concept papers and proposals to support the
implementation of the INCHR programs and activities highlighted in the Strategic Plan
b) Develop and submit proposal to develop the INCHR communication andoutreach strategy, and human rights training plan, and to establish the INCHR Human RightsResource Center
c) Develop proposal for submission to the PBF related to the GoL revised Peacebuilding and Reconciliation Program and the revised Statement of Mutual Commitments (SMCs) and PBF Priority Plan, and secure funding to support the setting up of the INCHR Regional Offices
d) Coordinate the development of the INHCR 3 years Annual Work Plan (AWP) related to the revised Justice and Security Joint Program (JSJP) for submission to the MFDP and UNDP, and secure funding to support the implementation of the AWP program outcomes, outputs and related activities

viii. 85% of the programs and activities in its Strategic Plan successfully implemented through efficient monitoring, reporting and evaluation by 2021

a) Internal monitoring, reporting and evaluation system in place that measures
progressagainst planned activities
b) Support the INCHR Departments to develop or revise AWP consistent with the
INCHR Strategic Plan
c) Develop and roll-out Internal Monitoring and Evaluation Plan in line with the Strategic Plan Performance Management Plan (PMP)

C) Improved access and respect for human rights

i) INCHR adequately addresses 60 % of the received complaints by 2021

a) Conducts expeditious investigations in all complaints received.
b) Conducts alternative dispute resolution (ADR).
c) Updates the computerized complaints handling and records management system.
d) Makes referrals and recommendations to the appropriate authorities for remedy

ii) State actors comply with 60% of the human rights recommendations by 2021

a) Conducts consultative meetings with stakeholders to address issues that lead to non-compliance
b) Holds follow-up meetings on recommendations made by INCHR, through impromptu visits.
c) Conducts monitoring exercises on all recommendations made, compile and publish quarterly reports on the status of INCHR recommendations.
d) Reviews complaints handling system
e) Computerizes case management system

iii. Quarterly and annual report on the hunan rights situation in Liberia, as well as thematic, indicence, and /or special reports submitted

a. Monitor and receive complaints on human rights violations and invetigate and submit comprehensive quarterly and annual reports
b. Condcut research on various thematic issues and incidences and submit thematic, incidences and or special reports

iv. 50% of indigents and pre-trial detainees have speedy access to justice

a. Provide legal counsel for indigents and pre-trial detainees.
b. Liaise with the Judiciary to provide adequate and speedy defense for indigents and pre-trial detainees
c. Organize legal aid clinics on human rights laws for CSOs and others
d. Liaise with the National Bar Association, Association of Female Lawyers, Human Rights Civil Society organizations to advocate for speedy access to Justice.

D) Improved state compliance with International, Regional and National Human
Rights Obligations

i. 60% of the international treaties ratified by 2021

a) Conducts working sessions with the Legislature, MOJ, MOFA, and Law Reform Commission to discuss factors that relates to timely ratification, amendments and reforms to be compliant with international treaties
b) Holds follow up meetings with Ministries and agencies to discuss achievements made in responding to their respective treaty obligations

ii. 50% of the required treaty reports submitted by the Government by
2021

a) Engage the Ministry of Justice and Ministry of Foreign Affairs to expedite the process of incomplete treaty obligations
b) Conduct stakeholders’ meetings to speed up the process of ratification
c) Prepares alternative or shadow reports on treaty obligations to respective treaty bodies
d) Builds capacities on treaty report writing

iii. 50% of the international treaties domesticated by 2021

a) In collaboration with the LRC, and other relevant institutions draft legislative proposals and make recommendations for reforms or amendments to the Legislature for consideration
b) Engage the Legislature, discuss factors that adversely affect the legislative process and advance workable solutions.

iv. 50% of the public policies, bills and legislations acquired by the INCHR are placed in the INCHR HRRC by 2021

a) Review proposed bills and conducts working sessions with the legislature on bills with unresolved human rights concerns.
b) Establish a Legislature-INCHR working group to meet periodically to assess progress made in this regard.

v. 75% of the UPR recommendations achieved by the Government by 2020, %80 of the TRC recommendations implemented by 2021

a) Monitoring and write shadow reports on the implementation of the UPR
recommendations
c) Support MOJ to set up an Inter-Ministerial Committee on the
implementation and reporting on the UPR recommendations
d) Organize along with the MOJ specialized training Government institutions, INCHR, and CSOs on UPR reporting
e) Prepare and submit shadow/alternative reports on treaty obligations to the UNTreaty Bodies
e) Develop a matrix that tracks the progress in the implementation of the
207 TRC recommendations
f ) Engage with the relevant institutions on the implementation of the TRC
recommendations
g) Submit periodic updates on the implementations of the TRC
recommendationsto the President

vi. Existing Laws repealed or amended consistent with international, regional and national human rights standards

a) Review international Protocols and standards, Conventions, Treaties and
Local Laws
b) Advisory legal opinion made on international instruments to the
Legislature

vii. Gender issues and sensitivity mainstreamed in various human rights related policies, programs and interventions

a) Review various human rights related documents and infuse gender
sensitivityand uniqueness as may be required
b) Mainstream gender perspectives and lens in the formulation of and
implementation of all the INCHR concept papers, project proposal as
wellas INCHR activities
E. Adequately informed and empowered citizenry and residents

i) 60% of the population informed of their human rights by 2021

a) Develops and roll-out communication and outreach program
b) Conducts sensitization campaigns, in the form of open air sensitization and town
hall meetings, radio/TV programs, booklets, posters, leaflets, policy briefs,
newsletters, bill-boards, as well as translate materials in vernaculars.
c) Organizes and conducts trainings for traditional chiefs, tribal governors, CSOs
and social service providers on harmful traditional practices, SGBV, rights of
women and children, etc.
d) Supports the incorporation of human rights topics in the education curriculum
for elementary and high schools.
e) Organizes human rights trainings on the rights of people in detention for key
state actors in the country.
f) Provides training for state actors and non-state actors on the role to respect,
protect and promote people’s fundamental rights.
g) Organizes public lectures and community human rights meetings to empower
the population on thematic human rights areas.
h) Conducts public lectures and community human rights meetings to empower
the population on thematic human rights areas.
i) Fosters the establishment of human rights clubs in schools.

ii) 65 % of the population aware of the role of the INCHR by 2021
a) Create awareness amongst residents in the counties to access INCHR services through county and regional offices and Human Rights Monitors and other staff
b) Increases its visibility through interactive meetings with the media, functional website, documentaries on air, functional library.
c) Publicizes its mandate through fact sheets, mobile clinics and featured radio/TV programs.

iii) 40% of the population able to demand their human rights by 2021
a) Creates the awareness for citizens to exercise their human rights under the law.
b) Define and advocates for clear and practical mechanisms through which
citizens and residents can demand their human rights.

iv) 60% of government institutions, human rights defenders and CSOs that work
for the promotion and protection of human rights capacity enhanced

a) Conducts various human rights trainings for key government institutions and
personnel including LNP, BIN, AFL, civil servants, CSOs, NGOs, traditional
chiefs and elders, etc.
b) Supports institutions and various actors trained to apply human rights norms and standards in their work.

CHAPTER 5: EXPECTED ACCOMPLISHMENTS
5.1 Key Result Areas

5.1.1 Improved service delivery by the Commission

The objective is to make INCHR an efficient and effective organization in realizing the targets set in the strategic outcomes. The key focus areas include: reviewing of the Commission’s structure, addressing staffing issues, enhancing management systems and working environment as well as consolidating financial resource base. The Commission also seeks to strengthen its internal systems and institutional accountability mechanisms. This will involve streamlining internal working procedures of the Commission, for example, the Code of Conduct, the staff recruitment and retention procedures, the financial management policies, communication and reporting procedures.

The specific strategies are as follows:

a)The Commission will undertake functional review as a matter of priority and revise the organizational structure from a technically focused to a functionally focused structure. This will be followed by reassigning staff as well as recruiting new staff to fill vacancies that will result from the functional review exercise. In order to enhance staff retention and improve motivation, conditions of service will be revised and staff capacity will be built. Capacity building for Commissioners will also need to be undertaken and enhanced.

b) The objective is to ensure that the Commission has all the necessary logistics: office equipment and supplies, furniture and vehicles/motor bikes, that will enable it to undertake the activities detailed in this plan. In the medium to long term the Commission plans to construct its own office complex. However in the interim the focus will be on acquiring offices that have enough space to establish Regional and County field offices. A few key activities will include:
i) Revising operational policy
ii) Reviewing management manuals
iii) Computerizing case management system
iv) Adhering to accountability requirements

5.1.2 Enhanced cooperation with stakeholders & Mobilize funding to implement the programs and activities of the Commission

a)Enhance strong partnerships and alliances with all key stakeholders in human rights. Since its inception, INCHR has been working with various stakeholders at the international, regional, national, district and community levels to fulfill its constitutional mandate. This was one of the appreciation that the human rights mandate was very wide and required the concerted efforts of several stakeholders operating at different levels. INCHR regards partnerships and strategic alliances as a central part of its strategic direction and focus in fulfillment of its constitutional mandate.
The Commission therefore supports the existence of a robust collaboration, coordination and communication system within INCHR and all justice institutions, development partners, government agencies, private sector, CSOs, media and the general public.

b)Enhance physical presence of INCHR regional offices and services. In order to address the physical presence gaps at community levels, the INCHR proposes to establish Regional and County offices countrywide. This calls for a rigorous resource mobilization drive from government and partners in the human rights field for infrastructural development and equipment.

c)Enhance INCHR’s corporate image. The Commission will invest in activities that promote its reputation before its wide clientele. A systematic branding, modern communication and information dissemination media coupled with use of social networks and branding are therefore seen as some of the interventions that will foster the INCHR image.

d)Mainstreaming human rights issues of persons in detention and other vulnerable persons (women, children, PWDs). In all the outcomes of the Strategic plan special consideration for protection of the rights of vulnerable persons shall be made. The process will involve determining the nature and magnitude of vulnerability in each of the outcomes in order to inform the interventions to be implemented.

e)The Human Rights Based Approach. The Commission shall enhance the operationalization of the Human Rights Based Approach (HRBA) principles and practices across all state and non-state institutions. The INCHR will promote and advocate for the streamlining of planning, implementation and evaluation processes consistent with the principles of equality and non-discrimination, participation, accountability, empowerment and the rule of law. All efforts shall be made to ensure HRBA is entrenched in the operational systems of government and non-state institutions.

f) All rights are equal. The Independent National Commission on Human Rights will promote the operationalization and implementation of the ‘All rights are equal’ strategy in the execution of planned interventions. In the end, the citizenry will be made to acknowledge and appreciate that human rights are universal and non-discriminative; inalienable, indivisible and interdependent.

g) Promote gender equality, women and children rights. The INCHR will promote gender equality and the elimination of all forms of discrimination especially against women, children and people with disabilities; and advocate for full participation of women in development which will result into an increased contribution by women towards economic, social and political development of the country. The INCHR will promote the equal access to education, employment opportunities and adequate health care services. Further, the Commission will regularly monitor the state for its own commitments on gender equality.

5.1.3 Improved access and respect for human rights
The recommendations of INCHR to bring redress on human rights violations require compliance by the respondents. The strategies devised to achieve this are as follows:

a) Conduct consultative meetings with stakeholders. INCHR will conduct meetings with stakeholders to address issues that lead to noncompliance of human rights recommendations. Meetings with those who have responsibilities to implement recommendations will be conducted. In addition, INCHR will undertake follow-ups through calls, letters & visits to ensure full adherence.

b) Conduct monitoring exercises on all recommendations made. This strategy will be implemented by compiling data on status of INCHR recommendations, produce quarterly reports on compliance of the recommendations and conduct monitoring visits to institutions and persons not complying.

c) Adopt and replicate best practices. A concept paper on best practices will be produced that will inform sensitization meetings on best practices.

d) Enhance accountability on human rights in Liberia. INCHR will prepare human rights accountability reports in line with international requirements and produce human rights situational report for Liberia on an annual basis.

5.1.4 Improved State compliance with International, Regional and National human rights obligations and citizens access to justice.

a)The strategies to achieve this objective will involve conducting working sessions with the Legislature, MOJ, MOFA to discuss factors that impede timely ratification of international treaties, and make follow up meetings with Ministries to discuss achievements made in responding to their respective treaty obligations.
b) Engage the MOFA, MOJ and other relevant agencies to expedite the process of incomplete treaty obligations and conduct stakeholders’ meetings to speed up the process of ratification.

5.1.5 Adequately informed and empowered citizenry and residents

Full realization of human rights cannot be achieved solely through the development of protective law and establishment of mechanisms to implement that law. INCHR will play a vital role in promoting human rights awareness in communities. The enjoyment of human rights largely depends on the level of awareness and knowledge of human rights by the citizenry and residents. The protection of human rights depends on people knowing about the rights to which they are entitled and the mechanisms which are available to enforce those rights. In the same way, all members of society should be made aware of their personal responsibilities under international and domestic law. Below are the strategies that INCHR will undertake to achieve this target:

a)Civic education for advocacy and empowerment: The goal is to create a positive change that goes beyond acquisition of knowledge and information for awareness. It creates motivation among citizens to cause or be part of the positive change. It promotes willingness and confidence to engage strongly in policy formulation, implementation and evaluation.

b) Train duty bearers. This will enhance human rights knowledge among duty bearers through sensitization meetings with managerial staff of government departments and corporations, Legislature, local officials, private sector executives, religious leaders and Traditional leaders. State institutions like AFL, Police, Prison, Immigration, among others will also be sensitized and trained.

5.2 Transitional Justice Issues

Since the final report of the TRC was submitted on June 30, 2009, hitherto, it has not been clear to the public what the outcome of the TRC will be, and certainly, there has been little or no consensus on how to address issues of reconciliation as they are laid out in the TRC recommendations. The lack of shared objectives for a process that can deal with the past has left a vacuum for (false) expectations and the possibility of disappointment. The TRC Act calls for the INCHR to follow-through on the implementation of the recommendations contained in the TRC Report. It is expected that the INCHR will write an updated progress report for the President for onward submission to the National Legislature in accordance with Section 4.4 of the Act establishing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of the Republic of Liberia. In addition, a few of the recommendations especially on transitional justice issues are assigned directly to the INCHR to lead in implementation. Over the next five years, the INCHR will have to look as horizontally as possible and decipher how it addresses transitional justice issues associated with the Liberia Civil War. The emphasis of the INCHR in the next five years would be more on restorative, regulatory and distributive forms of justice. The INCHR will also seek to incorporate information of the implementation of the TRC recommendations where possible in its Annual Report(s). It is important to begin to also track the implementation of the TRC recommendations alongside the implementation of the UPR recommendations and other Treaties obligations of the government. For example, in September 2015, a total of 186 recommendations were made in the UPR report from which the Government of Liberia accepted 147 and noted 39. As the government implements these recommendations, it could be good to determine how they are also linked to the TRC recommendations. This is also keen for meeting obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, as well as International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

Furthermore, people are not aware of the TRC recommendations as very limited copies of the report were produced. There is a need for dissemination of simplified version of the report to targeted population.

Through the INCHR implementation of reconciliation oriented aspects of the TRC recommendations should be supported. In addition, the Strategic Roadmap for National Healing Peacebuilding and Reconciliation assigns to the INCHR three key thematic areas intended to mend broken relationships, heal the wounds of the past and help reconcile the country. These include: the palava hut talks, memorialization, and reparations.

o Palava Hut - the TRC Recommendations call for the National Palava Hut program as another form of justice and accountability mechanism with traditional orientation to foster national healing and reconciliation at the community and grass root levels, creating the opportunity for dialogue and peace building.” (ref. TRC Rec. 15.1) The INCHR is tasked with the responsibility of developing a context-specific methodology for the Palava Hut, and overseeing the operation of the Palava Hut. The Palava Hut is intended to provide the fora where the wrongs of the civil war can be addressed through truth-telling and atonement in a context-specific Palava Hut process, thereby promoting healing and reconciliation at the community and national levels. This in turn will provide the foundation for social cohesion and national unity. The INCHR will work with the government, CSOs and various actors to discuss and identify means that address the below questions:
• How does the INCHR implement its tasks as assigned by the TRC report and the Reconciliation Roadmap?
• What is the INCHR work plan?
• How can the INCHR successfully use the Palava Hut as entry point to community level reconciliation, to include some level of reparation and memorialization process, in target areas/regions (most conflict sensitive)? The ethnography fora report is a good starting point for discussions.
• Where does the money come from?

o Memorialization – the TRC report identifies 155 massacre sites and consultations in many communities show that many more sites are yet to be identified and recognized. The aim of the memorialization is to create an enabling space to humanize and honor victims of the war, and officially recognize national regrets for the violation the people of Liberia suffered. Community based memorialization process will help communities develop and own a shared and reconciling narrative as a basis for community healing and recovery. Over the next five years, the INCHR will work to forge a common consensus on the way forward that will address the below issues:
• How does the INCHR get the Government buy-in to a full memorialization process?
• What mechanisms/systems are in place to implement memorialization?
• Where does the money come from?

• Reparation - the civil war has left all Liberians with scars for life but there are thousands others who continue to carry physical disabilities, including war-related particles in their bodies. While individual reparation programs may be economically difficult, the state must address the continuing physical wounds and provide for those disabled and made completely destitute by the war, in addition to community based direct and / or symbolic reparation. The TRC report assigns to the INCHR the responsibilities for establishing and resourcing the Reparation Trust Fund (Ref. TRC Rec. 17.2, 18.7), and to oversee national memorialization.
There is a dire need to point out the difference between reparative programs and development programs. The INCHR will therefore work with the government, CSOs and various actors to find answers to the following:

• How does the INCHR get the Government buy-in to a reparation process?
• What mechanisms/systems are in place to implement reparation? The TRC report calls for the setting up of a reparation trust fund. Where is the money going to come from?
• How do we address possible tensions and backlash arising from discussions of reparations, with counter discussion about the real need for state intervention to help victim communities more forward?

CHAPTER 6: MANAGEMENT OF INCHR STRATEGIC PLAN

6.1 INCHR Management Structure

INCHR is headed by the Chairperson and Members of the Commission. The Act provides for the appointment of the Chairperson and six Commissioners of INCHR. Currently there is a Chairperson and six Commissioners of INCHR. The Chairperson and Commissioners of INCHR are responsible for policy formulation and directing the affairs of INCHR.

The Commission has an Executive Director who is appointed by INCHR upon such terms and conditions specified in the INCHR Act. The Executive Director is responsible for, among others, carrying out the policy decisions of INCHR and the day-to-day administration of the affairs of INCHR.

The Commission is further consisted of administrative departments, for example:

a) Department of Administration and Budget,
b) Department of Planning, Internal Monitoring and Evaluation,
c) Department of Complaints, Investigations and Monitoring,
d) Department of Legislative Assistance. Treaty Matters and Law,
e) Department of Education, Training and Information,

6.2 Commissioners of INCHR

The primary function of the Commissioners of the INCHR is to provide overall supervision of the INCHR which include: laying out the policy framework that guides implementation of programs and realization of Commission targets and goals in achieving its legislative, policy and other mandate. Regarding the implementation of this Strategic Plan, the Commissioners of the INCHR will be responsible for approving the INCHR Strategic Plan, issuing policy direction, supervising its implementation and mobilizing resources to implement various programs and activities.

6.3 Management Committee

As described in its Act, the INCHR Board of Commissioners is the topmost administrative structure. A Management Committee comprising of the Executive Director, Directors, and heads of units/sections will be established. The Management Committee shall be responsible to roll-out the implementation of the Strategic Plan and ensure quarterly reports are made to the BOC. The Management Committee shall also advance strategies to ensure the success of the strategic plan with advice from Monitoring and Evaluation Unit within the DPIME.

6.4 Financing the Plan

The INCHR Strategic Plan has a lifespan of 5 years. It will be operationalized through annual rolling budgets consistent with the Medium Term Expenditure Frameworks of Government and Development Partners’ Letters of Undertakings. Specifically, the plan shall be financed through the following funding vessels:
a) GoL Budget Allocation
b) Donor funding
c) Funding through other domestic sources

[See chapter seven of costing and resource mobilization strategy for more on the Financial Plan.]

6.5 Department’s Results Matrix (Logframe)

Following the overview of each of the five Departments of the INCHR including transitonal justice issues this Strategic Plan presents the result matrix for each of the Departments and on Transitional Justice Issues related to the work of the Commission. The Department’s matrix resulted from technical working sessions that reviewed and decided on key activities of the Departments in line with the functions each Department described in the overview of the Departments. The matrix also highlights the INCHR Strategic Focus Areas and Outcome Areas that are related to specific Departments. The techncial working sessions of the Departments also identified key outputs and output indicators as well as related activities to be implemented to achieve the outcome areas. Each activity is also costed with funding source identified, thus informing the overall project cost for the implementation of the Strategic Plan over the next five years. Chapter 7 on Costing elaborates the budget and source of funding as well as a resource mobilization plan. Each of the Department result matrix also projects a “theory of change” that potentially would acheive as a result of the implementation of the activities of the Department. Ultimately, each “theory of change” is tied into achieveing the INCHR overall mandate the protection and promotion of human rights in Liberia. The “theory of change” specifies the how. Finally, the matrix also identifies the time frame for implementing each of the activities – set out in a five year period. Each year plan will form the basis for the development and implementation of the Department’s Annual Work Plan and INCHR’s AWP. (See below in landscape each of the Department’s Results Matrix).

6.7.1  DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION AND BUDGET

INCHR STRATEGIC PLAN: STRATEGIC AREA(S): ONE (1): [Ref. 4.5.2 (A)] Improved Service Delivery by the Commission
Theory of Change: By mid 2021, the INCHR institutional capacity would have been fully strengthened whilst at the same time systems of control and administrative procedures would have been put in place, thereby ensuring efficient and effective administration and functioning of the INCHR in achieving its mandate.
Outcome areas Outputs

(Indicators)

Output  Indicators, Baselines, Targets, & MoV

(Related Activity)

Activity, results and associated actions

Timeframe Funding Source Projected Cost

Yr. 1

Yr. 2

Yr. 3

Yr. 4

Yr. 5

GoL Other Total

Improved service delivery by the Commission and strengthened INCHR systems and institutional accountability

90% of the required human resource recruited by 2021

# of staff with appropriate skills recruited;

Baseline: 85 regular staff and 6 contractual staff as of the end of October 2016

Target: 100 new staff

MoV: Letter of employment; contract agreements; recruitment panel report; staff monthly and annual performance reports

a) Undertake functional review of the organizational structure from a technically focused to a functionally focused structure.

X

X

X

X

X

4,673,900

682,040

,355,940

b) Reassign staff and recruit new staff to fill vacancies that will result from the functional review exercise.

X

X

X

X

X

0.00

0.00

0.00

c) Revise conditions of service and build staff capacity in order to enhance staff retention and improve motivation

X

X

X

X

X

0.00

0.00

0.00

90% of essential logistics, office equipment, furniture  and supplies acquired  by 2021

# of logistics, office equipment, furniture and supplies procured and distributed

Baselines: 4 vehicles (2 project and 2 INCHR)

10 motorbikes

Baselines: See inventory listing for baselines on office equipment, furniture and supplies

Target: 18 vehicles (7 for 7 Commissioners, 5 for 5 regional offices 5 for 5 Departments & 1 Utility; 50 motorbikes

3 each  per 10 large and populated counties and 2 each for 5 small counties

MoV: Inventory list of physical assets; delivery notes

  1. Procurement of motor
vehicles and bikes, equipment, inter-com and internet connectivity systems, and office furniture and maintain them.

X

X

X

X

X

1,037,000

740,000

1,777,000

41.

  1. Review the Commission

 inventory and assess essential equipment gap

X

X

X

X

X

0.00

0.00

0.00

INCHR internal management system and control reviewed and strengthened by 2021

# of institutional documents developed

# of copies of institutional documents reviewed printed and distributed

Baselines: 0

Target: 10

MoV: Copies of institutional documents completed and operational

a)Revise, print and operationalize policies

X

X

10,000

0.00

10,000

b) Review and print  management manuals

X

X

10,000

0.00

10,000

  1. Adheare to
accountability requirements

X

X

0.00

0.00

0.00

  1. Review monitorig
and reporting systems

X

X

0.00

0.00

0.00

42.

Office accommodation improved by 2021

Land/acres for construction identified and acquired

Baselines: 0

Target: 4 lots (HQ), 1 lot each (regional office)

MoV: Title deeds, architecture plans and BOQ

  1. In the medium to long
term the Commission plans to construct its own office complex. However in the interim the focus will be on acquiring office space  to establish county (field) offices.  (Where regional hubs already exist, the INCHR will work with the MoJ for office space

X

X

X

X

750,000

346,000

1,096,000

  1. In the long term, acquire
land for the Commission

X

X

X

0.00

0.00

0.00

  1. Procure construction
services for INCHR Headquarters and regional offices

X

INCHR complies with the PFM Laws and related financial and administrative systems and control

# of financial reports completed and submitted

# of external audits conducted

Baseline 6

Targets: 20 quarterly reports ; 5 budgets;  and 5 annual financial statements

MOV: Copies of  financial and reports

a) Prepare monthly, quaterly and annual finacial reports, statements and budgets

X X X X X 27,500 5,000

43.

32,500

ICHR achieves  low risks resulting from proper financial management, reporting and compliance

# of system and financial audit conducted

Baselines: Moderate

Target: Low risks

MoV: Copies of audit and evaluation reports with rating

a) INCHR submits to external audits and evaluation as required by INCHR BOC, GAC and related insitutions

X

X X X X 10,000.00 0.00 10,000,000
GRAND TOTAL 6,518,400 1,773,040 8,291,440

  1. DEPARTMENT FOR PLANNING, INTERNAL MONITORING AND EVALUATION

INCHR STRATEGIC PLAN: STRATEGIC AREA(S): TWO (2): [Ref. 4.5.2 (B)] INCHR coordination and collaboration with stakeholders enhanced; 85% of funding needed for the Commission to implement its programs and projects mobilized; and INCHR Departments and staff performance strengthened, efficient and effective.

Theory of Change: Within five years, the INCHR  would have achieved about 90% of key results and deliverables described in the INCHR Five Year Strategic Plan through rigorous internal monitoring, reporting and evaluation, thereby leading the institution to achieve its statutory and policy related mandates and ensuring the full promotion and protection of human rights. In addition, through the development and submission of project proposals and from networking with various partners, the INCHR would have mobilized additional funds to implement most of its program activities that will greatly address various human rights violations and promote reconciliation and long-term development.
Outcome areas Outputs

(Indicators)

Output  Indicators, Baselines, Targets, & MoV

(Related Activity)

Activity results and associated actions

Timeframe Funding Source Projected cost

Yr. 1

Yr. 2

Yr. 3

Yr. 4

Yr. 5

GOL Others Total

INCHR coordination and collaboration with stakeholders enhanced;

85% of funding needed for the Commission to implement its programs and projects mobilized; and

INCHR Departments and staff performance strengthened, efficient and proficient.

Working Groups on human rights themes/issues established (involving representatives from human rights institutions) and functioning by 2017

# of Working Groups established, trained and functional

Baseline: 0

Targets: 6

MOV: Aid- Memoir/ MOUs;

Meeting minutes; report from joint program and activities

a) Develop and sign MoUs or Aide Memoir with select institutions on Working Groups (WG); provide training to enhance their capacity; hold regular WG meetings X X X X X 0.00

10,000

10,000

b) Implement joint programs on  human

rights as made be decided

X X X X X

10,000

20,000 30,000

# of CHRCs established

Baselines: 0

Targets 15

MOVs: ToR, meeting minutes and reports from various humam rights activities emminatingfrom or involving CHRCs

c) Set up County Human Rights Committees (CHRCs) X X X X X 0.00 30,000 30,000
  1. Provide training for the
 established CHRCs on human rights monitoring, reporting and advocacy
X X X     0.00 22,500 22,500

Congenial working relationship established with 80% of NGOs/CSOs working on human rights in Liberia by 2021

# of  agreements signed with CSOs and NGOs

Baselines: (0)

Target: 5

MOV: Copies of signed agreement; report from joint monitoring visits and other events; copies of quarterly updates provided by partners to the INCHR

  X X X X   0.00 5,000 5,000
b) Obtain regular updates on various human rights violations and related issues from partners working in rural parts of Liberia (where INCHR does not have field presence) and organize joint programs and training on human rights X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
INCHR accredited by the SCA of GANHRIs based in Geneva, Switzerland

# of processes involved with accreditation

Baselines: 0 – There has not been any accreditation process until recently

Target: INCHR seeks to get first 5 year accreditation

MoV: Report from accreditation meeting in Geneva; formal communication from GANHRI on INCHR category of accreditation

  X         100 0.00 100
b) Submit all the required documents including statement of compliance with the Paris Principles as may be requested by the SCA X         300 0.00 300
c) Attend accreditation meeting to defend application in Geneva X         0.00 15,000 15,000
  Government develops and implements its NAP on the UNGPs on BHRs with support from INCHR and other partners # stakeholders meetings held in preparation for developing the NAP a) Develop and submit concept note and proposal to the European Union (EU) for support towards developing NAP for the implementation of the UNGPs and BHRs X X       0.00 0.00 0.00
b) Conduct massive public outreach, consultations and engagement forum and sensitization to galvanize national urgency and commitments for a NAP on  the UNGPs  on BHRs. X X       0.00 150,000 150,000
c) Support the Government to set up National Advisory Board to lead on the development and implementation of the NAP X X       0,00 10,000 10,000
d) Conduct training with support from partners including the EU, UNDP, UNMIL, and the OHCHR Business and Human Rights Secretariat on developing and implementing NAP           0.00 25,000 25,000
e) Engage research (i.e. Humanity United) and human rights institution (i.e. Danish Institute for Human Rights) and think tanks (FBA) to conduct research on the impact of business on human rights in Liberia, etc.) to set baselines and inform the development of the NAP X X       0,00 100,000 100,000
f) Organize along with the Govenrment for various actors to attend and participate in the regular Annual BHR Forum X X X X X 25,000 50,000 75,000
g) Work with the Government and other actors and conduct training on how to develop and implement NAPs X X X       50,000 50,000
  2017 National Elections held with due consideration to human rights principles and standards thereby fostering violent free elections  

a) Develop and submit proposal to partners to support the INCHR to play its role as NHRI in the 2017

elections and beyond

X         0.00 0.00 0.00
 b) Organize trainings for various election actors on Human Rights, Democracy and the Rule of Law (with focus on the HR Based approach in elections process) – with technical support from the OHCHR’s Section on Democracy and Rule of Law which works particularly on elections. X X       0.00 40,000 40,000
c) Engage with various actors including the NEC, political parties, CSOs, media, etc to commit to upholding human rights especially the ICCPR and ICESCR, to do away with dangerous and hate speeches and promote violent free elections X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
d) Deploy INHCR Regional and County Teams to monitor and report on voters registration, campaign, and pooling, tabulation of ballots and well as post-election activities X X X X X 0.00 100,000 100,000
Government Fiscal Budget developed considering the HRBB approach by 2021   a) Engage the Government in particular the Executive and Legislature to commit to developing a HRBB     X X X 10,000 0.00 10,000
b) Help arrange for the requisite expertise to conduct training on HRBB for MACs of government, especially the MFDP and the Nat’l Legislature     X X   20,000 40,000 60,000
c) Follow-up on MACs and review draft budget to ensure it reflects a HRBB approach       X X 5,000 0.00 5,000
85% of funding required to implement INCHR Strategic Plan mobilized   a) Develop and submit concept notes and proposals to support the implementation of the INCHR programs and activities highlighted in the Strategic Plan. X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
b) Develop and submit proposal to develop the INHCR communication and outreach strategy, and human rights training plan, and to establish the INCHR Human Right Resource Center. X         0.00 20,000 20,000
c) Develop proposal for submission to the PBF related to the GoL revised Peacebuilding and Reconciliation Program, the revised SMC and PBF Priority Plan and secure funding to support the setting up of INCHR Regional Offices X X       0.00 500,000 500,000
d) Coordinate the development of the INCHR 3 years AWP related to the revised JSJP for submission to the MFDP and UNDP, and secure funding to support the implementation of the AWP program outcomes, outputs and related activities X X X X   20,000 590,000 610,000

85% of programs and activities successfully implemented by 2021, through efficient monitoring, reporting and evaluation

# of Departments

with AWP developed

# of Departments . with weekly and monthly agendas in place

Baseline: 0

Targets: 5

MoV: Departments AWP, monthly and annual report; copy of internal monitoring and evaluation plan

a) Internal monitoring, reporting and evaluation system in place that measures progress against planned activities. X

X

X X X 5,000 0.00 5,000
b) Support the Departments to develop or revise annual work plans consitent with the INCHR Strategic Plan X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00

c) Develop and roll-out Internal Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
GRAND TOTAL 95,400 1,777,500 1,872,900
 
   

6.7.3  DEPARTRMENT FOR COMPLAINTS INVESTIGATION AND MONITORINNG 

INCHR STRATEGIC PLAN: STRATEGIC AREA(S): THREE (3) [Ref. 4.5.2 (C)] Improved access and respect for human rights
Theory of Change: Through monitoring, documenting , investigating, and reporting  on human rights violations across the county over the next five years will ensure speedy redress for victims of human rights violations thereby leading to the promotion and protection of human rights of the citizens and fostering society the upholds and respects human rights.
Outcome areas Outputs

(Indicators)

Output  Indicators, Baselines, Targets, & MoV

(Related Activity)

Activity results and associated actions

Timeframe Funding Source Projected Cost
Yr. 1 Yr. 2 Yr. 3 Yr. 4 Yr. 5 GoL Others Total
Improved access and respect for human rights

80% of  the  complaints received and admitted related to human rights violations  are adequately addressed and reported by 2021

 

# of complaints received

# of  complaints investigated/ referred/ recommended

Baseline:20 in 2015

Targets:200

MoV: Quaterly/ Annual reports, Thematic reports, Complaints database registered and addressed

  1. Conducts expeditious
investigations in all complaints received.
X X X X X 100,000 200,000 300,000
  1. Conducts alternative
dispute resolution (ADR).
X X X X   400,000 200,000 600,000
  1. Updates the
computerized complaints handling and records management system.
X X X X X 25,000 75,000 100,000
  1. Makes referrals and

 recommendations to the appropriate authorities for remedy

X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
State actors comply with 60% of the human rights recommendations by 2021

# of State actors in compliance with recommendation

# of follow up meetings/ visits  with State Actors

Baselines: 4

Targets: 50

MoV: Copy of Quarterly and Annual human rights situation report; report on recommendations acted on; minutes for follow-up meeting and note to file

  1. Conducts
consultative meetings with stakeholders to address issues that lead to non-compliance
X X X X X 45,000

115,000

160,000

  b) Holds follow-up meetings on recommendations made by INCHR, through impromptu visits. X X X X X 100,000 200,000 300,000

c) Conducts monitoring

exercises on all recommendations made, compile and publish quarterly reports on the status of INCHR recommendations.

X X X X X 10,000 10,000 20,000

d) Reviews complaints

 handling system

X X X X X 10,000 20,000 30,000

e) Computerizes case

 management system

X X X X X 25,000 50,000 75,000
 

Quarterly and Annual reports on  the human rights situation of the country, as well as  thematic, incidence, and/or special  reports submitted

# of quarterly  reports submitted

# of thematic reports completed

Baselines:quaterly-0; annual–2 thematic-0, incidence/special report-3

Targets: quaterly-15; annual-5; thematic-10; incidence/special report-8

MoV: copies of quaterly and thematic reports

a) Monitor, and recieves complaints on human rights violation, investigate and submit comprehensive quarterly and annual  reports X X X X X 0.00 100,000. 100,000

b) conduct research on various thematic issues and incidences and submit thematic, incidences and or special reports

X X X X X 0.00 100,000 100,000

50% of idigents and pre-trial detainees have speedy access to justice

# of indigents and pre-trial detainees having access to jsutice

Baselines:

Target:

MoV:

a) Provide legal counsel for indigents and pre-tril detainees X X X X X 50,000 0.00 50,000
b) Liaise with the Judiciary to provide adequate and speedy defense for indigents and pretrial detainees X X X X X 10,000 0.00 10,000
c) Organize legal aid clinics on human rights lawsfor CSOs and others X X X X X 10,000 40,000 50,000

d) Liaise with the National bar Association, Association of Female Lawuers, and other human rights defenders

X X X X X 5,000 0.00 5,000
e) Civilsociety organization advocae for speedy access to justice for pre-trail detainees and indigents X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
GRAND TOTAL 790,000 1,090,000 1,880,000

6.7.4 DEPARTMENT FOR LEGISLATIVE ASSISTANCE, TREATY MATTERS AND LAW

INCHR STRATEGIC PLAN: STRATEGIC AREA(S):  FOUR (4) [Ref. 4.5.2 (D)] Improved state compliance with International, Regional and National Human Rights obligations and citizens access to justice
Theory of Change: Within five years, the Department of Legislative Assistance on Treaty Matters and Law would have established mechanisms that ensure advisory legal opinions are made regularly to the Legislature on International Protocols, Conventions and local laws; and would follow-up on and support the implementation of the TRC and UPR recommendations; as well as would have provided legal representation for the Commission and indigents provided. The Department will also collaborate with the DETI and the DPIME to set up the INCHR Human Rights Resource Center where all Human Rights instruments and bills from 2006 are available for research purpose.
Outcome areas Outputs

(Indicator)

Output Indicators

Baseline

Target, MoV

(Related Activity)

Activity results and associated actions

Timeframe Funding source Projected cost
Yr. 1 Yr. 2 Yr. 3 Yr. 4 Yr. 5 GoL Others

Total

Improved state compliance with International, Regional and National Human Rights obligations and citizens access to justice 60% of the international treaties ratified by the Government by 2021

# of treaties ratified

Baseline: 6

Target: 8

MoV: Government reports on its treaty obligations as well as copies of INCHR and CSOs shadow reports

  1. Conducts working
Sessionswith the legislature, MOJ, and Law Reform Commission to discuss factors that relates to timely ratification, amendments and reforms to be compliant with international treaties.
X X X X X 7,500 0.00 7,500
  1. Holds follow up
Meetingswith ministries and agencies to discuss achievements made in responding to their respective treaty obligations.
X X X X X 5,000 0.00 5,000
50% of the required treaty reports submitted by the Government  by 2021

# of  treaty reports submitted

Baseline: 2

Target: 8

MoV: Copies of treaty reports submitted; OHCHR website with country specific treaties and other reports

  1. Engage the MOJ and
MOFA to expedite the process of incomplete treaty obligations.

X

X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
  1. Conduct stakeholders’
meetings to speed up the process of ratification.
X X X X X 0.00 5,000 5,000
  1. Prepares alternative or
shadow reports on treaty obligations to respective treaty bodies.
X X X X X 2,000 0.00 2,000
  1. Builds capacities on
 treaty report writing,
X X X     0.00 40,000 40,000

50% of the international treaties domesticated by 2021

# of international treaties domesticated

Baseline:

Target: 6

MoV: Draft(s) of Legislative conclusions on domestication of  treaties / conventions

  1. In collaboration with
theLRC, and other relevant institutions draft legislative proposals and make recommendations for reforms or amendments to the Legislature for consideration
X X X X X 2,500 0.00 2,500
b) Engage the Legislature to discuss factors that adversely affect the legislative process and advance workable solutions X X X X X 5,000 0.00 5,000

50% of the public policies, bills and legislations acquired and placed in INCHR Human Rights Resource  (HRRC) Center by 2021

# of public policies, bills and legislations assessed

Baseline: 0

Target: 20

MoV: Hard/soft copies of public policies, bills and legislations available at the INCHR – HRRC

  1. Reviews proposed bills
and conducts working sessions with the legislature on bills with unresolved human rights concerns.
X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
  1. Establish a Legislature-

INCHR working group to meet periodically to assess progress made in this regard.

X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
  75% of UPR recommendations achieved and 80% of  TRC recommendations implemented

# of UPR Recommendations monitored

# of TRC Recommendations monitored  and implemented 

Baseline: 0

Target: 146 UPR recommendations; 207 TRC recommendations currently being executed

MoV: Quarterly  reports of the President for the Nat’l Legislature; Matrixes with progress reports against each of the 207 TRC recommendations

a) Monitor and write shadow reports on the implementation of the UPR Recommendations X X X X X 5,500 7,000 12,500
b) Support MOJ to set up an Inter-Ministerial Committee on the implementation of the  UPR recommendations X X X X X 0.00 20,000 20,000
c) Organize along with the MOJ specialized training for Government institutions,. INCHR and CSOs on UPR reporting X X X X X 0.00 10,000 10,000
d) Prepare and submit shadow reports on the treaties obligations to various UN Treaty Bodies. X X X X X 0.00 1,000 1,000
  1. Develop a matrix that
tracks the progress in the implementation of the 207 TRC recommendations
X X X X X 5,000 0.00 5,000
  1. Engage with the
relevantinstitutions on the implementation of the TRC recommendations 
X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
  1. Monitor the
implementation of and prepare report on the status of the TRC recommendations for submission to the President
X X X X X 10,000 25,000 35,000
  Existing Laws repealed or amended consistent with international HR instruments and standards

# of international Protocols, Conventions, Treaties and Local Laws reviewed

Baseline: 0

Target: 9

MoV: Hard and soft copies of treaty reviewed

a) Review international Protocols, Conventions, Treaties and Local Laws X X X X X 1,400 2,500 3,900
b) Advisory legal opinion made on international instruments to the Legislature  X X X X X 5,000 0.00 5,000
Gender issues and sensitivity mainstreamed in various human rights policies, programs, and intervention

# of documents with gender considerations

 Baselines: 3

Target: All key documents and concept papers and proposal

MoV: Gender marker clearly articulated and vivid in all the key documents

a) Review various human rights documents and infuse gender sensitivity and specificities as may be required X X X X X   5,000 5,000
b) mainstream gender perspectives and lens in the formulation of and implementation of all the INCHR concept papers as well as INCHR activities X X X X X 0,00 0,00 0,00
Set-up a Unit with in the INCHR to focus exclusive on gender issues as well as issues related to persons with disabilities and other vulnerable groups X X X X X 25,000 50,000 75,000
Conduct training for the INCHR requisite staff in gender mainstreaming and help them apply knowledge an skill acquired X X X X X  

20,000

20,000
GRAND TOTAL 73,900 185,500 259,400
 
   

6.7.5   DEPARTMENT FOR EDUCATION, TRAINING AND INFORMATION

INCHR STRATEGIC PLAN: STRATEGIC  AREA (s): FIVE (5): [Ref. 4.5.2 (E)] Adequately informed and empowered citizenry and residents
 
Theory of Change:  A  knowledgeable society with understanding of human rights through awareness, education and training programs thereby minimizing the incidences of human rights abuses and voilations in Liberia and citizens seek redress to human rights violations by referring to the INCHR and related instutitions cases of enfrringement of rights.
Outcome areas Outputs

(Indicators)

Outcomes,  Indicators, Baselines, Targets, & MoV

(Related Activity)

Activity results and associated actions

Timeframe Funding Source Projected Cost
Yr. 1 Yr. 2 Yr. 3 Yr. 4 Yr. 5 GoL Others USD
Adequately informed and empowered citizenry and residents 60% of the population informed of their human rights by 2021

# of people advocating for their basic human rights]

Baseline; Limited number

Target: 60%

MoV: Survey reports, number of citizens and communities advocating their right for justice as well as uphold and respect the rights of others

  1. Develops and roll-out
Communicationand outreach programs
X X X X X 0.00 5,000 5,000
  1. Conducts sensitization
campaigns, in the form of open air sensitization and town hall meetings, radio/TV programs, booklets, posters, leaflets, policy briefs, newsletters, bill-boards, as well as translate materials in vernaculars.
X X X X X 100,000 250,000 350,000
  1. Organizes trainings for
traditional chiefs, tribal governors, CSOs and social service providers on harmful traditional practices, SGBV, rights of women and children, etc.
X X X X X 5,000 20,000 25,000
  1. Supports the
incorporation of human rights topics in the education curriculum for elementary and high schools
X X X X X 0.00 50,000 50,000
  1. Organizes human 
rightstrainings on the rights of people in detention for key state actors in the country.
X X X X X 5,000 20,000 25,000
  1. Provides training for
State actors and non-state actors on the role to respect, protect and promote people’s fundamental rights. 
X X X X X 25,000 75,000 100,000
  1. Organizes public
lectures and community human rights meetings to empower the population on thematic human rights areas.
X X X X X 5,000 20,000 25,000
  1. Conducts public
Lecturesand community human rights meetings to empower the population on thematic human rights areas.
X X X X X 0.00 50,000 50,000
  1. Foster the
establishmentof human  rights clubs in schools.
X X X X X 0.00 20,000 20,000
  65 % of the population aware of the role of the INCHR by 2021

# of citizens / residents engaging the INCHR

Baseline: Very limited/minimal

Target: 50% (ceitzens and residents of age) with complaints of human rights violations

MoV: Massive increase in the # of complaints  - see database

  1. Increases accessibility
ofits services in all parts of the country.
X X X X X 100,000 200,000 300,000
  1. Increases its visibility
through interactive meetings with the media, functional website, documentaries on air, functional library.
X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
  1. Publicizes its mandate
through fact sheets, mobile clinics and featured radio/TV programs.
X X X X X 10,000 0.00 10,000

40 % of the population able to demand their human rights by 2021

# of persons seeking redress for violations

Baseline 0

Target: 40%

MoV:  Court and Police reports

  1. Mobilizes citizens to
exercise their human rights under the law.
X X X X X 5,000 15,000 20,000
  1. Define and advocates

for clear  and practical mechanisms through which citizens and residents can demand their human rights

X X X X X 0.00 5,000 5,000
60 % of Government institutions, human rights defenders and CSOs that work for the promotion and protection of human rights capacity enhanced

# of institutions and personnel trained in various human rights topics and areas

Baselines: Few and very limited

Target: Adequate and substantive trainings – about 20

MoV: Training reports

a) Conducts various human rights trainings for key Government institutions and personnel including, LNP, BIN, AFL, civil servants, CSOs, NGOs etc.

X X X X X 100,000 200,000 300,000

# of institutions and personnel applying human rights standards and norms in their work

Baselines: (0) as related to the INCHR previous training – unverified

Target; 90 % of institutions and personnel trained

MoV: Job performace , and very minimun reports of human rights violations

b) Supports institutions and various actors trained to apply human rights norms and standards in their work

X X X X X 0.00 50,000 50,000
GRAND TOTAL 355,000 980,000 1,335,000
 
   

6.7.6  Transitional Justice Issues

INCHR STRATEGIC PLAN: STRATEGIC  AREA (S): Put in place mechanisms and programmatic frameworks to address transitional justice issues assigned to the INCHR in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Report, the Strategic Roadmap for National Healing Peacebuilding and Reconciliation and the Agenda for Transformation
Responsible Department: Department for Planning, Internal Monitoring and Evaluation
Theory of Change:  By the end of 2015, mechanisms and frameworks would have been in place to begin to holistically address transitional issues associated with the Liberia civil conflict especially as recommended by the TRC report and highlighted in the National Reconciliation Roadmap, thereby leading to a formal process of national healing, peacebuilding and reconciliation, as well as leading to redress for victims of the civil war that suffered from various human rights abuses and violations.
Outcome areas Outputs

(Indicators)

Outcomes,  Indicators, Baselines, Targets, & MoV

(Related Activity)

Activity results and associated actions

Timeframe Funding Source Projected Cost
Yr. 1 Yr. 2 Yr. 3 Yr. 4 Yr. 5 GoL Others USD
Mechanisms and programmatic frameworks in place to begin to address transitional justice issues related to the Liberian civil crisis

National healing and  reconciliation  forged through the National Palaa Hut talks, as well as memoriallization and reparation programs that help to address the horrific past of the civil war

# of frameworks put in place

Baseline: 1 (The National Palava Hut talks underway)

Target: Two (2) policy and programmatic  frameworks on:

 1) Memorialization and 2) Reparations

MoV: National memorials – pyhsical strucature; reports and documentaries from memorialization programs; National Reparations Trust Fund and report from reparation programs

a) Convene  meetings with stakeholders and key actors including the GoL, CSO and other partners to put in place and  implement transitional justice programs

X X X     .0.00 20,000 20,000
b) Work with the relevant GoL institutions, including CSOs and other partners to set up a National Reparations Trust Fund X X X     0.00 20,000 20,000

The wrongs of the civil war addressed through truth -telling and atonement in a context-specific Palava Hut process, thereby promoting national healing and reconciliation at the community and national level.

War-induced conflicts and abuses complied and inform the design of Palava Hut methodologies and process

# of war induced conflicts and violations listed

# of trauma healing sessions conducted

# of mediation sessions conducted

Baseline: 0

Target:  40 cases of war related violation and conflcit heard (at least 10 per region along linguistic groupings

MoV:  Reports, documentaries

a) Conduct research on war – induced conflict and abuses including taking statement from victims and perpetrators X X X     0.00 25,000 25,000
b) Set up and train National Palava Hut Committee X X X X   0.00 30,000 30,000
c) Recruit and train Note takers, psychosocial counselors X X X X   0.00 20,000 20,000
d) Provide psychosocial support to both victims and perpetrators in preparation for appearance before the palava hut committee X X X X   0.00 25,000 25,000
e) Conduct palava hut talks that promotes community based truth -telling, healing and reconciliation X X X     0.00 100,000 100,000
f) Conduct mediation and psychosocial sessions to promote healing and reconciliation X X X     0.00 15,000 15,000
  70% of citizens in targeted communities for the pilot palava hut talks informed and 40% of citizens informed national wide

# of awareness, sentization and outeach programs that inform and galvnerize citizens understand, support and participation in the palava hut and other transitional justice activities

# of communities reached

# of persons participating in the palava hut process disaggregated by sex

Baseline: Public awareness conducted in 3 regions, 2016

Target:  Public awareness conducted nationwide, by 2020

MoV: Reports  and documentaries

a) Develop a communication and outreach plan and recruit 3 NGOs to provide public awareness and outreach of the National Palava Hut talks X X X     0.00 50,000 50,000
b) Hold massive public outreach and mobilize public support, understanding, endorsement and participation in the palava hut process X X X     0.00 30,000 30,000
c) Conduct social mobilization and hold town hall meetings on Palava Hut methodologies X X X     0.00 20.000 20,000
Women Palava Hut Committees trained to support in conflict mediation and culturally sensitive violations and other issues related to women

# of Women Palava Hut Committees set up

# of women trained and meaningfully contributing  in the PH processes

Baselines: 0 – but a few Peace Hut Committees that focus on women issues exist and could included

Target: 4

Committees along linguistic groupings

MoV: Training and facilitation reports

a) Identify  and/or establish Women Peace Committees

X X X     0.00 15,000 15,000

b) Conduct trainings for four Women Peace Committees

X X X     20,000 10,00 30,000

National acknowledgement, consolidation, and public statement concerning the role of the state in past abuses before, during, and after the civil war  pronounced

# of  public statements and acknowledgements made by the state

Baseline: 0

Target: 1 major public statatement on  acknowledgement and pardon in a formal program

MoV: Publications in newspapers, public radio broadcasts; National Unity and Memorial Day Act

a) Identify mass grave sites and construct memorials

X X X X   0.00 0.00 0,00

National Unity and Memorial Day enacted into law to remember the devastating loss of lives and properties and to celebrate Liberia’s new sense of inclusive community

Sites of massacres and war-time atrocities turned into a trauma-healing memorial of recognition, forgiveness, and continued life in the reconstructed state of Liberia

 

a) Work with relevant actors  and put in plans to construct one National Peace and Reconciliation

Museums

X X X X   10,000 0.00 10,000

b) Support five cleansing and atonement rites including public apology and memorialization agreed by communities and that adhere to human rights principles

X X X X X 10,000 0.00 10,000

c) Plant peace trees and recreation in communities where massacres were carried out

X X X X X 0.00 15,000 15,000

Community based memorialization programs designed and implemented so that specific community atrocities are reconciled (i.e. letters of recognition, days of mourning)

Inter-ethnic memorialization programs designed and implemented so that there is a proud recognition of ethnic difference within the context of a national identity and unity.

Indicator# of inter – ethnic memorial designed and implemented

Baseline: 0

Target: 100 inter – ethnic program designed and implemented  by 2019

Mov: Reports, Documentaries

a) Work with relevant actors  and put in plans to construct one National Peace and Reconciliation Monument

Work with relevant actors  and put in plans to construct one National Peace and Reconciliation

Museums

X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
b) Support five cleansing and atonement rites including public apology and memorialization agreed by communities and that adhere to human rights principles X X X X   65,000 60,000 125,000
c) Identify and arrange appropriate burials for victims X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00
d) Provide institutional capacity development support including training, equipment, supplies and transportation X X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00

Systematic and comprehensive sex-disaggregated victims directory created, identifying those individuals who continue to suffer physical and psychological harm due to war, as well as those made completely destitute by the war.

# of victims identified, registered and disaggregated by sex and cases

# of community based program designed and implemented

Baseline: 0 – however, TRC

Report 2009 contains a list of individuals

MoV: List of victims and reports for support

a) Create victims selection criteria and develop standards for individual and communal selection

X X X X   20,000 100,000 120,000
b) Identify medical service and counseling centers to cater for the physically and psychologically impaired victins resulting from the civil war   X X X X 0.00 0.00 0.00

c) Issue death certificates to families of all identified and verified victims of the civil war, as requested (including the families of the Catholic Nuns)

  X X X X 10,000 0.00 10,000

Comprehensive Reparations Policy enacted to ensure transparent identification of victims and provide the criteria for how decisions will be made about who receives reparations, and how much and a Reparations Trust Fund Set up

# of Reparation Policy put in place and operations

Baselines: (0)

Target: 50% of  persons and 100 communities receive reparation by 2020; At least 1000 families received death certificates

Mov:Trust Fund Policy, list of reparation beneficiaries, reports documentary

Mov: List of beneficiaries, Reports

Indicator:# of families issued  death certificates

d) Convene meetings with key stakeholders including the Government, CSOs, and other actions to decide on the reparations program X X X X   10,000 20,000 30,000
d) Develop and enact National Reparations Policy and Set up a Reparation Trust Fund X X X     20,000 0.00 20,000
e) Lunch and implement the Reparations Program and designed (cost as well as source for funding for the reparations program to be decided by the government and other actors) X X X X X 0.00

0.00

0.00
Mental health recovery and medical support for victims, their families and communities designed and implemented

Indicator:# of mental health program(s) established and functional and  recovery programs and medical  support designed and implemented

Baseline: 0

Target: Psychosocial services provided

 to  at least 300 persons benefit from mental heath recovery and medical support services by 2019

MoV: Report from mental health programs; listing of persons receiving mental health support

a) Work with various partners and communities to identify cases of mental health resulting from the Liberian  civil war   X X X   20,000 40,000 60,000
b) Work with the MoH and other actors to provide psychosocial support for victims of mental heath   X X X X 100,000 300,000 400,000
GRAND TOTAL 285,000 915,000 1,200,000

CHAPTER 7: STRATEGIC PLAN COSTING & RESOURCE MOBILIZATION PLAN

7.1 Introduction

Previous chapters and Departments Results Matrix as well as the section on Transition Justice Issues and programs have identified the key activities and programs the Commission intends to undertake and implement over the duration of this Strategic Plan. Projections are also made on the funding required to implement these activities and programs thereby contributing towards the INCHR fully achieving its mandate, and which will ultimately lead to protecting and promoting human rights across Liberia. This chapter presents realistic estimates of the financial costs of these activities and programs and compares the costs against the potential availability of the funds to finance them.

The cost estimates were derived through a bottom-up approach. Each Department estimated the cost of implementing their activities in the Department Results Matrix that contribute to achieving the strategic outcome areas as well as transitional justice issues over the period 2016-2021. Based on this analysis, the estimated total costs for fully implementing the INCHR activities over the next five years will be US$14,838,740 million. On the financing side, the INCHR with budgetary allocation from Government estimates that it will be able to generate approximately US$8,117,700 million, leaving a gross financing gap of approximately US$6,720,540 million over the Strategic Plan period (about US$1,344,103 – more than 1m per year), before taking into account financing from other internal and external sources. A significant portion of this gross financing gap will hopefully be filled by funds obtained from programs and projects that are potentially funded by donors and partners. At the moment there is already a commitment of 1,190,000 from donors and partners.

This remaining financing gap after current partner commitments must be closed through some combination of additional government revenue, additional support from the international community, financing from public-private partnerships (domestic and foreign), and scaling back or re-phasing of proposed departmental activities. The chapter also identifies some of the key broad areas that remain unfunded (or under-funded) that would be scaled back in the event that additional financing is not available.

Although financing is the focus of the discussion in this chapter, the Commission fully understands that financing alone will not determine the success of the Strategic Plan. Achieving the Strategic Outcomes will require strong Government commitment, policy reforms, concerted efforts to build capacity, vibrant CSOs and citizen participation, and effective and efficient supporting arrangements with partners, alongside appropriate levels of financing. Thus, the analysis of financing constraints described in this chapter should be considered in conjunction with the policy commitments and other changes described earlier in the Strategic Plan and the analysis of capacity constraints and risks described in other chapters.

As a result, the strategy document does contain some programs and activities for which there are no associated costs indicated. The total cost expressed in this chapter is best described as the cost for the institution highest priorities, not every action articulated. For example, while the Commission will work closely with the Government of Liberia, CSOs and other partners to set up and begin the implementation of the national reparations program, a national memorialization program and the full implementation of national palava hut pilot program, the costing associated with these activities are not included. These programs are not costed because it is difficult at the point to determine the commitments precisely due to a paucity of complete data and information. At the same time, there are no clear mechanisms established for the roll-out of these programs that could provide some insights on the figures.

7.2 Cost Estimates

Two basic approaches have shaped the costing exercise. First, the estimated cost of each activity has been derived using techniques that are fully consistent with established budgeting principles. This enables the Strategic Plan to be integrated as seamlessly as possible into the Government’s existing budgeting processes. Second, the approach to the costing and budgeting exercise is iterative; the cost of each activity is based on the best readily available estimates with the expectation that they will be updated regularly as experience accumulates and new information emerges.

The initial cost estimates included here for each activity are based on analysis conducted by each of the Departments with consultation of the Department for Administration and Budget. Some Departments had difficulty obtaining the data to fully cost their activities over the Strategic Planning process; however, the vast majority was able to locate data and worked to justify the assumptions made in calculating costs.

Table 1 presents the detailed costs. The data are arranged by year and grouped per Department, including costs associated with transitional justice activities. Not surprisingly, the bulk of the identified costs are concentrated in Strategic Area 1 - put in place systems of control and administrative procedures to ensure an effective and efficient administration and functioning of the INCHR. These costs relate to the Department of Administration and Budget. Personnel, head office construction, human capacity building, internet and intercom connectivity establishment, and the procuring of logistics, equipment, stationeries and supplies; these sub-categories together account for about (55.8 %) of the total cost of full implementation of the Five Years Strategic Plan. Many of the other activities relate to education, training, information dissemination, monitoring, investigating, resource mobilization, treaty matters, law, planning, and celebrating related activities such as International Human Rights Day, etc.

Several specific items warrant further discussion. One of the strategic areas of INCHR Strategic plan is to “ensure rigorous education, training and information dissemination as well as public outreach on human rights and related issues” that is central to achieving almost all the strategic area of the Strategic Plan in relation to the institution mandate.

Similarly, the costs of monitoring, investigating, documenting and reporting human rights violations are significant. As noted in the DETI result matrix, the INCHR is explicit seeking to train CBOs/CSOs to increase the conduct of massive human rights awareness sessions at community level through the communication and outreach plan. The INCHR also plans to work with the a few key institutions including the Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) to provide regular training the military human rights, Civil Service Agency to begin to provide human rights training for civil servants, and with the universities and other institutions of higher

learning as well as high schools to include in their curriculum a course on human rights. Similar efforts will be employed working with the Liberia National Police, Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization and other para-security and rule of law institutions.

The costs associated with the Department of Legislative Assistant, Treaty Matters and Law is very minimum and could be understated but where necessary, adjustments will be made. A component of the Department budget is directed towards monitoring the implementation of the TRC and UPR recommendations to ensure commitment and compliance; researching and safe keeping human rights instruments; reviewing international protocols, conventions, treaties and local laws thereby providing advisory legal opinion to the legislature. With respect to the Department for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, the figure project is funding expected to be mobilized directly from project intended to help implement some of the INCHR key programs.

Table 1: Costs by Department for Fiscal Years 2016/2017 through 2020/2021 (in US$)

 

FY

2016/2017

FY

2017/2018

FY 2018/2019 FY 2019/2020 FY 2020/2021 Total/ %
Department I: Administration and Budget
Personnel Cost 1,103,700 1,250,000 1,300,000 1,325,000 1,349,140 76.41%
Goods & Services    123,166    200,000    225,000    231,334    250,000. 12.43%
Capital Expend.    100,000    150,000    200,000    230,000    244,100   9%
             
             
Subtotal 1,326,866 1,600,000 1,725,000 1,786,334 1,843,240 100%
Department II: Planning, Internal Monitoring & Evaluation
Programs 561,870 468,225 374,580 280,935 187,290 100%
             
Subtotal 561,870 468,225 374,580 280,935 187,290 100%
Department III: Complaints, Investigation and Monitoring
Programs 564,000 470,000 376,000 282,000 188,000 100%
             
Subtotal 564,000 470,000 376,000 282,000 188,000 100%
Department IV: Legislative Assistance, Treaty Matters and Law
Programs

77,820

64,850

51,880

38,910

25,940

100%
             
Subtotal 77,820

64,850

 

51,880

 

38,910

 

25,940

 

100%
Department V: Education, Training and Information
Programs

400,650

333,875

267,100

200,325

133,550

100%
             
Subtotal 400,650

333,875

 

267,100

 

200,325

 

133,550

 

100%
Transitional Justice Issues – related to the TRC Recommendations & Thematic Areas assigned to the INCHR in the Reconciliation Roadmap
Programs

360,000

300,000

240,000

180,000

120,000

100%
             
Subtotal 360,000

300,000

 

240,000

 

180,000

 

120,000

 

100%
Grand Total 3,291,206 3,236,950 3,034,560  2,768,504  2,498,020      100%

Department I, does not include costs associated for office space rental at Justice and Security hubs 2 and 3 for INCHR regional offices. The financial sector of the employee’s salary does not include increment in present salary; the INCHR will explore ways to address these issues over time.

The second part of the costing framework is to derive the aggregate resource envelope. The first step is to estimate total funding for the Strategic Plan period. Although the Government is fully committed to providing fund in the national budget for the functioning of the INCHR, they are based on the twin assumptions of robust economic growth and an increase in revenue.

From the current projection of just over 0.268273226% of GoL revenues is going towards INCHR. Based on this calculus, government financing available for INCHR activities is estimated to be US$8,117,700 million for the five-year period. 

Table 2:  Total Projections as against GoL Revenues for INCHR, FY 2016/2017 through 2020/2021 (US$ millions)

  FY 2016/2017

FY

2017/2018

FY 2018/2019 FY 2019/2020 FY 2020/2021 Total %
Total GoL Revenue 555,993,000 580,593,000 599,309,000 629,274,450 660,738,172 3,025,907,622
GoL Revenue for INCHR     1,226,866     1,676,632     1,556,107     1,757,625     1,800,065       8,117,700
Percentage (%) of GoL Revenue 0.220662% 0.288779% 0.259650% 0.279309% 0.272432% 0.268273%

Source: Government fiscal budget allocation to the INCHR 2005 – 2015.

Aggregate Costs and the Gross Financing Gap

Table 3 summarizes the costs and government resources available for INCHR Strategic Plan activities. The table indicates that after financing from the Government, there is a remaining gap of approximately US$6,720,540 million (about 45.29% of the total).  A significant portion of this gap will be financed through resource mobilization and potential donor commitments for their institutions related activities.

 

Table 3:  Strategic Plan Gross Financing Gap, FY 2016/2017 through 2020/2021 (US$---- millions) 

  FY 2016/2017 FY 2017/2018 FY 2018/2019 FY 2019/2020 FY 2020/2021 Total %

SP Total Cost

2,845,336 2,702,593   2,635,716   2,644,127  2,891,133 100%
Govt. INCHR SP Financing 1,226,866 1,237,034 1,276,911 1,318,027 1,360,467   46.7%
Gross Strategic Plan Gap 1,618,470 1,465,559 1,358,805 1,326,100 1,530,666    53%

Ultimately, the financing gap must be closed, either through additional financing or by scaling back or re-phasing proposed Strategic Plan activities. On the financing side, one possibility could be further increases in INCHR budgetary allocation. However, as mentioned previously, the current revenue projections are based on the twin assumptions of donors support and a significant increase in the INCHR budget, taking into account a substantial additional increase in Government revenues with Legislative and Executive Branches of Government prioritizing INCHR which is unlikely. A second option is financing from the private sector, and other partners through INCHR accreditation, donors support or other arrangements. The INCHR will be pursuing these options in appropriate departmental activities, but they are likely to be limited in scope during the five-year implementation period. A third option is increased support from the international community from new partners.

The estimate for current GoL financing towards the INCHR Strategic Plan is based on figures drawn from functional classifications in the FY 2016/2017 budget, and should be seen as extremely rough estimates. The INCHR will compile additional data and information from its partners in preparation for the partners’ forum on the Strategic Plan around particular sectors (human rights, education and elections monitoring) in order to get a fuller picture of the net gap (including already committed funds) and potential financing options.

Support to Finance Specific Programs and Projects

The average gross financing gap of approximately US$1,334,108 per year, to be financed through partner contributions is high. Total average human rights grant financing from partners was estimated at US$200,000.00in 2015; as such, a significant increase in partner is necessary to fully close the gap and ensure full implementation of the Strategic Plan.

7.3 Resource Mobilization Plan

With the Strategic Plan now completed and the costing analysis completed, which has identified sources of funding and funding gaps, the INCHR looks forward discussing with its partners how they will modify and adjust their strategies to ensure that they are fully aligned with the Strategic Plan priorities as well as help mobilize the additional resources needed. It also urges current and new partners to consider increased resource mobilization to ensure the Strategic Plan is fully implemented and achieves its important goal. It is in this respect that this mobilization plan is developed. First the plan identifies potential sources of funding but first focuses of contributions from the Government. Second, it focuses on mobilizing funding from internal and external partners but in this endeavor the INCHR considers: 1) financial sustainability, 2) institutional sustainability, and 3) national ownership.

7.3.1 Government of Liberia Contribution (2006 – 2013)

The INCHR was established in 2005 but started is work in 2010. Since 2010 until 2015 fiscal budget the government has contributed the total of US$7,130,916.00 for the operational cost of the INCHR. Going forward with this plan, it is projected that between fiscal budget years 2016/2017 to 2020/2021 the Government of Liberia would contribute the total of US$8,117,700.00.

This projection is realistic given the average of government budgetary allocation to the INCHR since 2010. Furthermore since 2015, the INCHR has received a total of approximately US$1,308,000.00 (especially between 2014 to present) from other partners and funding mechanisms for the support of a few of the Commission’s programs. From this amount, a total of US$1,000,000.00 has been provided to support the implementation of pilot of the National Palava Hut program from the UNPBF and an additional US$308,000 from the Bureau of Crisis Prevention and Recovery – UNDP in New York. An addition, a total of US$112,719.00 has been provided through the Justice and Security Joint Program with additional contribution from PBF and from the Justice and Security Trust Fund (JSTF) to support the deployment of INCHR Human Rights Monitors assigned in the counties. There has been some funding from UNDP – Liberia in the amount of US$75,000.00 to support INCHR study visits and to enhance the INCHR’s capacity to follow-up on the implementation of the TRC recommendations, the Liberia National Human Rights Action Plan and the UPR recommendations as well as Treaty obligations, while the total of US$55,000.00 has been contributed to support particular programs through UNMIL Quick Impact Project (QIPs).

In addition, the INCHR will seek to mobilize resources from Local/Internal sources. These will include:

  • Ensure Government financial support through its fiscal budget;
  • Ensure continuous support of key institutions responsible for meeting peacebuilding and reconciliation deliverables, as part of the implementation of the National Reconciliation Roadmap and the Liberia Vision 2030

7.3.2 Private Sector

In recent times, the nexus or the relationship between human rights and business or the private sector has been an area of focus. Business and human rights is an important, evolving area of rights which has also become a potential focus area for consideration by the Commission. There are ongoing business and human rights initiatives where the Commission wants to collaborate with Business institutions, including concession companies in Liberia for the promotion and protection of human rights especially the rights of employees and residents of concession rich areas.  Since 2006 to date, the Government of Liberia (GoL) has granted a little over 24 grant agreements amounting to over 18 million in investment some for a period of over 25 years. These wide-scale natural resource concessions have unfortunately triggered a new wave of conflicts and grievance. On a number of occasions these unrests have escalated into violence and the Government had to deploy the Liberia National Police and other paramilitary units to quell the violence. However, the underlining causes of the conflict or violence most of which are rights based have not been addressed. The bulk of these disputes are sourced in contests around land tenure, use and management, and related social, economic issues as well as issues around 'voice and accountability’. While in rural poor, but rich in minerals communities, citizens have little or no say in decisions that affect their well-being; local leaders on the other hand seem not to be accountable at all to the citizens.

The INCHR is under obligation both by its Act and by International Human Rights Conventions and Treaties to ensure the protection of rights of all citizens, as well as, ensure the promotion of the economic, social and cultural rights of the citizens. In this regards, the Commission will work with the relevant institution of Government and the concerned parties to advance recommendations that are practical and implementable so as to address these human rights violations.

Most importantly the INCHR will be working with the working with the government, CSOs state owned enterprises, corporate entities as well as small to medium size enterprises and other stakeholders including bilateral and multilateral partners and the UN to put in place a National Action Plan (NAP) for the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles and Business and Human Rights and ensure compliance with related frameworks and regulations.

       7.3.3 External Resources Mobilization (International Partners)

  • Approach the Global Alliance for National Human Rights Institutions (GANHRI) and related bodies
  • Approach bilateral partners especially those that contribute to democracy, justice security, peace and development in Liberia 
  • Approach the UN Peacebuilding Fund for additional support
  • Seek support through the Justice and Security Joint Program and the Justice and Security Trust Fund
  • Approach UNMIL through QIPs and UNDP for continuous support
  • Liaise with the UN PBC Liberia Country-Specific Configuration members bilaterally
  • Approach African Union
  • Approach ECOWAS
  • Reach out to private human rights based foundations and instructions

      7.3.4 Sustainability

Finally, an indispensable element of mobilizing resource externally is the need for sustainability. Sustainability should be considered in three aspects: 1) Financial sustainability, 2) Institutional sustainability, and 3) National ownership.

1) Financial sustainability needs to consider:

· Introducing constant (for the next 5 – 20 years human rights horizon) line in national budget

· Establishing “Trust Fund for Peace” in partnership with private sector (concessions, county development and social development funds), with a focus on human rights as the foundation for peace, security and national development

· Reforming concession agreements to include support for peace and reconciliation including human rights activities

2) Institutional sustainability needs to take into consideration

· Undertaking continuous M&E process and impact analysis through bottom up institutional architecture that measures progress and outcomes on the implementation of the Strategic Plan

· Publishing periodical annual Peace and Human Rights Index (MIA-PBO to under national conflict mapping exercise and bi annual national reconciliation barometer survey)

· Establishing “Open Door for the Public Office” for human rights – perhaps the INCHR Human Rights Resource Center to be established

· Institutionalizing inter-institutional coordination (to include information sharing; M&E; oversight; implementation; support; mutual capacity development)

· Institutionalizing horizontal and vertical information sharing in an open and transparent manner.

· Institutionalizing transnational cross-fertilization for the sharing of Best Practices and Lessons Learned on the promotion and protection of human rights.

3) National Ownership - this could be achieved by

· Institutionalizing continuous civic engagement through existing religious, educational, traditional and media institutions.

· Introducing or rolling out of the curriculum for human rights, peace, civic education and dialogue in formal and informal educational institutions

· Undertaking annual recognition and award ceremony for actors and institutions that promote and protect human rights (bottom-up nomination process)

CHAPTER 8: STRATEGIC PLAN – TWO YEAR PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT PLAN (JULY 2016 – DECEMBER 2018)

Introduction

This Performance Management Plan (PMP) sets the basis for measuring the implementation of key activities highlighted in the each of the Department’s Results Matrix so and to ensure activities are on track. It will measure progress over the first two and a half years (July 2016 – December 2018), leading to the mid-term evaluation of the Strategic Plan. Unlike the Results Matrix, the PMP projects a number of critical assumptions (which implicitly) allows for risks and mitigation strategies. It also lists the inputs needed to achieve the overall goal. As much as possible, the PMP sets realistic targets that are achievable and measurable within in the next two and a half years. While the majority of the indicators are quantitative, a few are also qualitative and ties in with the expected theory of change. Finally, the mid-term evaluation as projected in the PMP is formative, as such, at the end of the first two and a half years the INCHR will be able to determine and make adjustments or revisions in its activities going forward. The inputs column will track the extent to which human, financial and other resources were mobilized and the challenges experienced so as to determine areas for realignment and readjustments.

 

Department of Administration and Budget
Overall GOAL Indicators, critical assumptions and MoV Target July 2016- December 2018 Inputs

Put in place systems of control and administrative procedures to ensure effective and efficient administration and functioning of the INCHR

Theory of change:

Within 5 years, the department of administration and budget would have fully implemented its mandate by having a whole some functioning institution with adequate budget well managed and accounted for, fully staff in its own building, and all administrative documents operationalized.

  1. # of administrative documents reviewed and adopted by BOC.
  1. # of administrative documents printed and distributed

Review, adopt, and print five (5) administrative documents

Location of four (4) construction sites across the country for INCHR buildings

Recruit, train and deploy remaining staff with positions on organogram with logistics

Develop institutional guidelines- Asset Management (1) and Procurement (1)

Financial statement (10) and annual budget (3) prepared

Two (2) Vehicles and five (5) motorbikes

  1. INCHR Budget allocation for DAB Staff
  1. Vehicles
  1. Internet access
  1. Stationary and supplies
  1. # of staff with appropriate skills recruited
  1. construction site for INCHR HQ located with sites for regional offices and head quarters
  2. # of institutional guidelines in place
  3. # of financial statement and annual budget prepared
  4. # of logistics and office equipment available

Critical assumptions:

- An increase in budgetary allocation and human resource capacity will lead to high performance there by supporting the achievement of INCHR mandate.

-  By decentralizing the Commission, the incidence of human rights violations will reduce

Means of verification (MoV):

Filed copies of financial reports, meeting minutes, note to file,  copies of administrative documents, employment / contract letters

Department of Planning, Internal Monitoring and Evaluation
Overall GOAL Indicators, critical assumptions and MoV Target July 2016- Dec. 2018 Inputs

Develop and implement various programs and plans and set in place an internal monitoring and evaluation plan (or performance management plan), and forge partnerships and newwork with a wide range of national, regional and international human rights institutions, mechanisms and actors.

Theory of change

Theory of Change: Within five years, the INCHR would have achieved about 90% of key results and deliverables described in the INCHR Five Year Strategic Plan and Departments’ Annual Work Plans (AWP) through rigorous internal monitoring, reporting and evaluation, thereby leading the institution to achieve its statutory and policy related mandates and ensuring the full promotion and protection of human rights. In addition, through the development and submission of project proposals, the INCHR would have additional funds to implement most of its program activities that will greatly address various human rights violations and promote reconciliation for long-term development.

(1) # of Concept notes written with follow-up proposals; Number of grants received and fully implemented.

Complete twelve (5) concept notes with follow up proposals for donor support.

Fifty (15) AWP developed with an internal M&E plan in place

  1. Budget allocation to ensure Department staff salary
  1. Internet access
  1. Stationeries and accessories
(2) # of Departments with AWP developed and monitored by an internal M&E plans / tracker

(3) Data base of donors with human rights support line completed, and number of proposals submitted from donor list.

(4) INCHR gains accreditation and forge collaboration with regional and international NHRIs .

(5) # of programs / activities plan for and implemented

Critical assumptions:

- INCHR is able to source funds from donors to bridge the financial gap in its budget enabling delivery on its mandate.

 Departments performance rate increase as a result of an effective monitoring and evaluation system in place

Means of verification (MoV):

Filed copies of concept notes / proposals, copies of grant signed, M&E tools, templates; and project reports; Department’s monthly and annual reports; Aide Memoir and MoU signed with various institutions and partners

 

                                                                                                         

Department of Complaints, Investigation and Monitoring
Overall GOAL Indicators, critical assumptions and MoV Target July 2016-December 2018 Inputs

Strengthen or set up effective and efficient mechanisms for complaints, investigation, monitoring and reporting

Theory of change

Over the next five years, the Department of CIM will ensure speedy redress for victims of human rights violations through its monitoring, documenting, investigating, and reporting procedures thereby leading to the promotion and protection of human rights of citizens and foster a free fair and just society.

  1. # of monitors trained in human rights monitoring and documenting

Conduct five (8) trainings in human rights monitoring for INCHR monitors and CSOs.

75% of complaints received are verified, investigated, and recommendations made.

Ten (10) performance assessment field trips for monitors and investigators

  1. INCHR Budget allocation for DCIM

Staff

  1. Vehicles, motorbikes, fuel, lubricants, stationaries and accessories
  1. Internet access
(2)# of complaints received, verified, investigated and recommendations made

(3)# of field trips with field assessment report on monitors and investigators completed

(4) Revise complaint handling system in place and digital case management system  established

  1. # of legal issues and representations made for indigents

Critical assumptions:

- Incidence of human rights violations is greatly reduced as a resultof INCHR intervention.

-  Capacity enhancement of monitors and investigators will result to an efficient mitigation of human rights violations thus gaining public trust.

Means of verification (MoV):

File copies of reports

Department of Legislative Assistance, Treaty Matters and Law
Overall GOAL Indicators, critical assumptions and MoV Target July 2016-December 2018 Inputs

Strengthen the institutional capacity of the INCHR, to achieve its mandate as assigned by the INCHR Act and other legal and policy frameworks and set up an effective and efficient mechanisms for legislative assistance, treaty matters and law

Theory of change:

Within five years, the Department of Legislative Assistance on Treaty Matters and Law would have established mechanisms that ensure advisory legal opinions are made regularly to the Legislature on International Protocols, Conventions and local laws; and would follow-up on and support the implementation of the TRC and UPR recommendations; as well as would have provided legal representation for the Commission. The Department will also collaborate with the DETI and the DPIME to set up the INCHR Human Rights Resource Center where all Human Rights instruments and bills from 2006 are available for research purpose..

  1. # of Human Rights instruments and local laws available for research

80% of Human Rights instruments from last ten years resourced and secured

Six (6) International instruments (Protocols, Conventions, Treaties) and Local Laws reviewed

Monitor the implementation of one hundred eight (108) TRC currently executed and (146) UPR recommendations

Twelve (12) cases represented

  1. INCHR Budget allocation for DLATML Staff
  1. Vehicles
  1. Internet access
  1. Stationary and supplies
  1. # of international Protocols, Conventions, Treaties and Local Laws reviewed and advisory opinion made
  1. # of  TRC and UPR Recommendations monitored

Critical assumptions:

- By following up on the TRC and UPR recommendations and legal advisory opinion to the Legislature the INCHR will obtain international standards.

Means of verification (MoV):

Reports

Department of Education, Training and Information
Overall GOAL Indicators, critical assumptions and MoV Target July 2016- December 2018 Inputs

Ensure rigorous education, training and information dissemination as well as public outreach on human rights and related issues

Theory of change:

Within 5 years, Liberia will have a human rights knowledgeable society with understanding through awareness and training programs thereby minimizing the incidence of HR abuses and violations especially in violence prone areas and referring to INCHR in cases of infringement on one’s rights. In addition, citizens across Liberia would be aware of the role and functions of the INCHR and take advantage of knowledge gained to seek redress.

(1) # of Civil Awareness/training programs and campaigns in schools, communities, government institutions, etc. conducted

75 Institutions around the country received civil awareness education/training

Five (2) copies each of Communication and Outreach Plan and HR education/training manuals printed

# of education, information materials produced, printed and distributed

One Human Rights Resource Center established for training and research

  1. INCHR Budget allocation for DETI Staff
  2. Vehicles, motorbikes, fuel and lubricants
  1. Internet access
  1. Resource materials /Stationaries, books, publications, treaties and bills and other reference materials, as well as computers for web-based research

(2) Research, draft, validate, print and launch human rights Educational and Training manuals

(3)# of educational and information materials (Newsletters, Brochures, Policy Brief, Giggles, Fliers, Bill Boards, etc) produced, printed, and distributed

(4) # of tangible visibility available across the country

(5) % of citizens seeking redress for violated rights

Critical assumptions:

- Incidence of human rights violations will reduce as a result of human rights education, awareness, and promotion.

-  Duty bearers and citizens are educated of their rights and responsibilities respectively.

Means of verification (MoV):

Filed copies of reports, copies of educational & training materials, distribution plan and photos

Transitional Justice Issues
Overall GOAL Indicators, critical assumptions and MoV Target July 2016- December 2018 Inputs

Put in place mechanisms and programmatic frameworks to address transitional justice issues assigned to the INCHR in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report, the Strategic Roadmap for National Healing Peacebuilding and Reconciliation and the Agenda for Transformation

Theory of change:

By the end of 2015, mechanisms and frameworks would have been in place to begin to holistically address transitional issues associated with the Liberia civil conflict especially as recommended by the TRC report and highlighted in the National Reconciliation Roadmap, thereby leading to a formal process of national healing, peacebuilding and reconciliation, as well as leading to redress for victims of the civil war that suffered from various human rights abuses and violations.

(1) # of programs and fora addressing transition justice issues

Two (2) policy and programmatic  frameworks on: 1) Memorialization and

2) Reparations

40 cases of war related violations and conflicts heard (at least 10 per region along linguistice groupings)

1 major public statement on acknowledgement and pardom in a formal program

100 inter-ethnic program designed and implemented by 2019

Public awanerness conducted up to 2020

100 inter – ethnic program designed and implemented  by 2019

20 community programs designed and implemented by 2019

50% of persons mentioed for individual tpye reparatioins and 100 communities receive reparation by 2020

At least 1000 famalies receive death certificates for desease family members

  1. INCHR Budget allocation for Transitional Justice issues
  1. Vehicles, motorbikes, fuel and lubricants
  1. Internet access
  1. Funding from GoL and partners for national memorialization and reparations program

(2) Research, draft, validate, print and launch human rights Educational and Training manuals

(3)# of people/citizens and communities participating in the palava hut process, benefiting from reparations and other programs, as well as number of memorials constructed

Critical assumptions:

  • National healing and reconciliation achieved through the palava hut talks, memorialization and reparations
  • Impunity address and justice attained thereby leading to massive reduction in incidence of human rights violations
  • About 60% of victims of the Liberia civil crisis listed in the TRC report and others identified through the palava hut process will redress for atrocities committed against them during the civil war, while a number of citizens bring to closure their grieve and hurt from the death of their love ones that died and buried in mass graves.

Means of verification (MoV):

Filed copies of reports from palava hut talks, list of persons and communities that benefit from reparations and other programs, physical structure of memorials and death certificate issued.

 

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